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Identification of Peer Effects Using Group Size Variation

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  • D'Haultfoeuille, Xavier
  • Davezies, Laurent
  • Fougère, Denis

Abstract

This paper considers the semiparametric identification of endogenous and exogenous peer effects based on group size variation. We show that Lee (2006)’s linear-in-means model is generically identified, even when all members of the group are not observed. While unnecessary in general, homoskedasticity may be required in special cases to recover all parameters. Extensions to asymmetric responses to peers and binary outcomes are also considered. Once more, most parameters are semiparametrically identified under weak conditions. However, recovering all of them requires more stringent assumptions. Eventually, we bring theoretical evidence that the model is more adapted to small groups.

Suggested Citation

  • D'Haultfoeuille, Xavier & Davezies, Laurent & Fougère, Denis, 2006. "Identification of Peer Effects Using Group Size Variation," CEPR Discussion Papers 5865, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:5865
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    linear-in-means model; semiparametric identification; social interactions;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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