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Returns to Mobility in the transition to a Market Economy

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  • Tito Boeri
  • Christopher Flinn

Abstract

In spite of the ongoing dramatic changes in the structure of employment, transitional economies display rather low mobility across sectors, occupations and firms of different ownership. We characterise this low mobility of central and eastern European labour markets by computing mobility measures for transition matrices, the latter estimated on the basis of matched records across LFS waves. As low mobility can be explained by high costs of shifting jobs compared to the vbenefits one can get from the job change as well as by segmentation in the allocation of job offers, we develop an econometric model enabling to characterise intertemporal changes in probabilities of dismissal, remunerations and offer arrival rates on the basis of information only on observed transitions. This model is seminally implemented on matched data across various waves of the Polish LFS. Although our results are highly pre6liminary, they point to significant segmentation in the allocation of job offers, more stability in public sector versus private sector jobs, and little, if any, rewards to tenure and age in the private sector. Were these findings supported in further work, they could support explanations for low mobility in transitional ecnomies, which are based on informational failures, notably that fact that job offers do not reach those who are most prone to take up jobs, and on the fact that changing jobs and moving from public to private enterprises is costly especially for those with relatively long tenures and work records.

Suggested Citation

  • Tito Boeri & Christopher Flinn, 1997. "Returns to Mobility in the transition to a Market Economy," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 108, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:1997-108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Patrick Puhani & Viktor Steiner, 1997. "The Effectiveness and Efficiency of Active Labour Market Policies in Poland," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 209-231, October.
    2. Lubyova, Martina & van Ours, Jan, 1997. "Unemployment dynamics and the restructuring of the Slovak unemployment benefit system," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 925-934, April.
    3. Tito Boeri, 1994. "“Transitional” unemployment," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 2(1), pages 1-25, March.
    4. Flinn, Christopher J., 1997. "Labor Market Structure and Welfare: A Comparison of Italy and the U.S," Working Papers 97-07, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    5. Puhani, Patrick A. & Steiner, Viktor, 1996. "Public works for Poland? Active labour market policies during transition," ZEW Discussion Papers 96-01, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    6. Micklewright, John & Nagy, Gyula, 1996. "Labour market policy and the unemployed in Hungary," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 819-828, April.
    7. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-1024, September.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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