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Young children and women's labour force participation in Russia, 1992-2004


  • Louise Grogan
  • Katerina Koka


We document the changing labour force participation patterns of women with young children in Russia during 1992-2004. In this period maternity leave benefits became less generous, and childcare was privatized and became increasingly scarce. Using nationally representative household survey data it is shown that in 1992, there was essentially no association between the probability of a woman being a labour force participant and her having a child under age 3. However, by 2004, having children under age 3 had become associated with significantly reduced participation and employment probabilities, conditional on other observable characteristics of women and their households, and local factors. Several potential explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Suggested Citation

  • Louise Grogan & Katerina Koka, 2010. "Young children and women's labour force participation in Russia, 1992-2004," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(4), pages 715-739, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:18:y:2010:i:4:p:715-739

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hare, Denise, 2016. "What accounts for the decline in labor force participation among married women in urban China, 1991–2011?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 251-266.
    2. Grogan, Louise & Koka, Katerina, 2013. "Economic crises and wellbeing: Social norms and home production," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 241-258.
    3. Norberto Pignatti, 2016. "Encouraging women’s labor force participation in transition countries," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 264-264, June.
    4. Gianna Giannelli & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Luca Piccoli, 2013. "Do parents drink their children’s welfare? Intra-household allocation of time between market labour, domestic work and child care in Russia," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-23, December.

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