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Economic crises and wellbeing: Social norms and home production

  • Grogan, Louise
  • Koka, Katerina

Why does work appear more important to the life satisfaction of some population groups than others? Household data from Russia in 1992 allows plausible identification of the causal impact of being workless on time spent in home production and life satisfaction. We present a model of home production in which men face stigma in some non-market activities, so that their ability to substitute into work at home is circumscribed. Consistent with our model, we find that worklessness causes men's time in productive activities to decrease much more than women's. Impacts of worklessness on life satisfaction are much larger for men.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 92 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 241-258

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:92:y:2013:i:c:p:241-258
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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