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The effect of non-pecuniary motivations on labor supply

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  • Farzin, Y.H.

Abstract

People value work not only as a means of earning income to satisfy their consumption needs but also as a direct source of satisfaction for its socio-psychological effects (non-pecuniary benefits). I show that once non-pecuniary effects of working time are incorporated in the standard labor-supply model: (i) the wage rate under-estimates (over-estimates) the true opportunity cost of non-work/leisure time when working time has non-pecuniary benefits (costs), (ii) non-pecuniary work motivations can substitute for monetary wages as work incentives, (iii) at very low wage rates, work can become a net source of utility, and (iv) the implied shape of labor-supply curve differs starkly from those implied by standard theory. I identify conditions under which a greater non-pecuniary work motivation induces a larger supply of labor, and examine the effects of non-wage income on supplies of paid work and voluntary work when there are non-pecuniary benefits associated with both types of work.

Suggested Citation

  • Farzin, Y.H., 2009. "The effect of non-pecuniary motivations on labor supply," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 1236-1259, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:49:y:2009:i:4:p:1236-1259
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    Cited by:

    1. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2016. "Labor Supply as a Choice Among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(3), pages 487-506, April.
    2. Mario Cogoy, 2010. "Consumption, time and the environment," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 459-477, December.
    3. Tiago Cavalcanti & Márcio Corrêa, 2014. "Cash Transfers to the Poor and the Labor Market: An Equilibrium Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 741-762, November.
    4. Lars Kunze & Nicolai Suppa, 2013. "Job Characteristics and Labour Supply," Ruhr Economic Papers 0418, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    5. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2014. "Labor supply as a discrete choice among latent jobs: Unobserved heterogeneity and identification," Discussion Papers 786, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    6. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2012. "Labor supply as a discrete choice among latent jobs," Discussion Papers 709, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    7. repec:zbw:rwirep:0418 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Y. Farzin & K. Akao, 2015. "Poverty, social preference for employment, and natural resource depletion," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(1), pages 1-26, January.

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