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Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification

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  • Dagsvik, John K.

    () (Research Department, Statistics Norway, and the Frisch Centre of Economic Research)

  • Jia, Zhiyang

    () (Statistics Norway)

Abstract

This paper discusses aspects of a framework for modeling labor supply where the notion of job choice is fundamental. In this framework, workers are assumed to have preferences over latent job opportunities belonging to worker-specific choice sets from which they choose their preferred job. The observed hours of work and wage is interpreted as the job-specific hours and wage of the chosen job. The main contribution of this paper is an analysis of the identification problem of this framework under various conditions, when conventional cross-section micro-data are applied. The modeling framework is applied to analyze labor supply behavior for married/cohabiting couples using Norwegian micro data. Specifically, we estimate two model versions with in the general framework. Based on the empirical results, we discuss further qualitative properties of the model versions. Finally, we apply the preferred model version to conduct a simulation experiment of a counterfactual policy reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Dagsvik, John K. & Jia, Zhiyang, 2014. "Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification," Memorandum 22/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2014_022
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Thoresen, Thor O. & Vattø, Trine E., 2019. "An up-to-date joint labor supply and child care choice model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 51-73.
    2. John K. Dagsvik & Steinar Strøm, 2017. "Labor supply analysis with non-convex budget sets without the Hausman approach," Discussion Papers 857, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Dagsvik, John K. & Strøm, Steinar & Locatelli, Marilena, 2019. "Marginal Compensated Effects in Discrete Labor Supply Models," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201906, University of Turin.
    4. Vidar Christiansen & Zhiyang Jia & Thor Olav Thoresen, 2018. "Assessing Income Tax Perturbations," CESifo Working Paper Series 7428, CESifo.
    5. Dagsvik, John K, 2017. "Invariance Axioms and Functional Form Restrictions in Structural Models," Memorandum 08/2017, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    6. Dagsvik, John K., 2018. "Invariance axioms and functional form restrictions in structural models," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 85-95.
    7. Zhiyang Jia & Trine E. Vattø, 2016. "The path of labor supply adjustment. Sources of lagged responses to tax-benefit reforms," Discussion Papers 854, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor supply; non-pecuniary job attributes; latent choice sets; random utility models; identification;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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