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Job Search, Hours Restrictions, and Desired Hours of Work

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  • Hans G. Bloemen

Abstract

A structural empirical job search model is presented that incorporates the labor supply decision of individuals. The arrival of a job offer is modeled as a random draw from a wage-hours offer distribution. Subjective information is used on desired working hours to identify optimal hours from offered hours. Policy simulations are performed to address several policy questions: Does a decrease in unemployment benefits lead to the acceptance of jobs with less preferred working hours? How does a decrease in the length of the standard working week affect the job acceptance behavior of the unemployed?

Suggested Citation

  • Hans G. Bloemen, 2008. "Job Search, Hours Restrictions, and Desired Hours of Work," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 137-179.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:p:137-179
    DOI: 10.1086/522069
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borsch-Supan, Axel & Hajivassiliou, Vassilis A., 1993. "Smooth unbiased multivariate probability simulators for maximum likelihood estimation of limited dependent variable models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 347-368, August.
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    3. Dickens, William T & Lundberg, Shelly J, 1993. "Hours Restrictions and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(1), pages 169-192, February.
    4. Bloemen, Hans G., 2000. "A model of labour supply with job offer restrictions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 297-312, May.
    5. Bloemen, Hans G., 1997. "Job search theory, labour supply and unemployment duration," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 305-325, August.
    6. Andrews, Donald W. K., 1988. "Chi-square diagnostic tests for econometric models : Introduction and applications," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 135-156, January.
    7. Joseph G. Altonji & Christina H. Paxson, 1992. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints, and Job Mobility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(2), pages 256-278.
    8. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-694, July.
    9. Blau, David M. & Robins, Philip K., 1986. "Job search, wage offers, and unemployment insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 173-197, March.
    10. Andrews, Donald W K, 1988. "Chi-Square Diagnostic Tests for Econometric Models: Theory," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(6), pages 1419-1453, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Flabbi, Luca & Mabli, James, 2012. "Household Search or Individual Search: Does It Matter? Evidence from Lifetime Inequality Estimates," IZA Discussion Papers 6908, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Lonnie Golden & Stuart Glosser, 2013. "Work sharing as a potential policy tool for creating more and better employment: A review of the evidence," Chapters,in: Work Sharing during the Great Recession, chapter 7, pages 203-258 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Luke Haywood & Michael Neumann, 2017. "The Role of Aggregate Preferences for Labor Supply: Evidence from Low-Paid Employment," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1652, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2016. "Labor Supply as a Choice Among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(3), pages 487-506, April.
    5. Nick Frazier & Flavio Cunha, 2016. "A Model of Human Capital Formation and Contractual Unpredictability," 2016 Meeting Papers 1204, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Flabbi, Luca & Moro, Andrea, 2012. "The effect of job flexibility on female labor market outcomes: Estimates from a search and bargaining model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 168(1), pages 81-95.
    7. Egbert Jongen, 2009. "An analysis of individual accounts for the unemployment risk in the Netherlands," CPB Document 186, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    8. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2012. "Labor supply as a discrete choice among latent jobs," Discussion Papers 709, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia & Tom Kornstad & Thor O. Thoresen, 2014. "Theoretical And Practical Arguments For Modeling Labor Supply As A Choice Among Latent Jobs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 134-151, February.
    10. Paul Sullivan & Ted To, 2014. "Search and Nonwage Job Characteristics," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(2), pages 472-507.
    11. John Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia & Kristian Orsini & Guy Camp, 2011. "Subsidies on low-skilled workers’ social security contributions: the case of Belgium," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 779-806, May.
    12. Bloemen, Hans, 2010. "Income Taxation in an Empirical Collective Household Labour Supply Model with Discrete Hours," IZA Discussion Papers 4697, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Magali Beffy & Richard Blundell & Antoine Bozio & Guy Laroque, 2014. "Labour supply and taxation with restricted choices," IFS Working Papers W14/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    14. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2008. "An Alternative Approach to Labor Supply Modeling. Emphasizing Job-type as Choice Variable," Discussion Papers 550, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    15. Keith A. Bender & John Douglas Satun, 2009. "Constrained By Hours And Restricted In Wages: The Quality Of Matches In The Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(3), pages 512-529, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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