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Female Labour Supply, Flexibility Of Working Hours, And Job Mobility

  • Euwals, Rob
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    In the empirical literature on labour supply, several static models are developed to incorporate constraints on working hours. These models do not address to what extent working hours are constrained within jobs, and to what extent working hours can be adjusted by means of changing employer. The aim of this paper is to measure the flexibility of working hours within and between jobs by utilizing subjective information on individual preferences to adjustments in working hours. The potential endogeneity of both the subjective information and job mobility will be taken into account. Furthermore, we argue that the Netherlands is an interesting country for the study of working hour flexibility, as part-time employment is fairly common. Empirical analysis based on a sample of employed women in the Dutch Socio-Economic Panel (1987-1989) shows, however, that the flexibility of working hours within jobs is low. Job mobility is a means of adjustment in working hours mainly for women who want to work more hours.

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    Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 2419.

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    Date of creation: Apr 2000
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    Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2419
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    1. Robert Gibbons & Lawrence Katz, 1989. "Layoffs and Lemons," NBER Working Papers 2968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Gourieroux, Christian & Monfort, Alain, 1993. "Simulation-based inference : A survey with special reference to panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 5-33, September.
    3. Joseph Altonji & Christina Paxson, 1990. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints and Job Mobility," Working Papers 651, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    4. Ham, John C, 1982. "Estimation of a Labour Supply Model with Censoring Due to Unemployment and Underemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 335-54, July.
    5. repec:ner:tilbur:urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364378 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Moffitt, Robert, 1982. "The Tobit Model, Hours of Work and Institutional Constraints," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(3), pages 510-15, August.
    7. William T. Dickens & Shelly J. Lundberg, 1985. "Hours Restrictions and Labor Supply," NBER Working Papers 1638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Arthur van Soest & Isolde Woittiez & Arie Kapteyn, 1990. "Labor Supply, Income Taxes, and Hours Restrictions in the Netherlands," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(3), pages 517-558.
    9. Blundell, Richard William & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," CEPR Discussion Papers 149, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Joseph Altonji & Christina Paxson, 1985. "Job Characteristics and Hours of Work," Working Papers 578, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    11. Axel Borsch-Supan & Daniel McFadden & Reinhold Schnabel, 1993. "Living Arrangements: Health and Wealth Effects," NBER Working Papers 4398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Euwals, R.W. & Melenberg, B. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1997. "Testing the Predicitive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data," Discussion Paper 1997-25, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    13. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Euwals, Rob & Eymann, Angelika, 1999. "Portfolio Choice with Behavioral Decision Mechanisms," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 99-37, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
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