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Female Labour Supply, Flexibility of Working Hours, and Job Mobility in the Netherlands


  • Euwals, Rob

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)


In the empirical literature on labour supply, several static models are developed to incorporate constraints on working hours. These models do not address to what extent working hours are constrained within jobs, and to what extent working hours can be adjusted by means of changing employer. The aim of this paper is to measure the flexibility of working hours within and between jobs by utilizing subjective information on individual preferences to adjustments in working hours. The potential endogeneity of both the subjective information and job mobility will be taken into account. Furthermore, we argue that the Netherlands is an interesting country for the study of working hour flexibility, as part-time employment is fairly common. Empirical analysis based on a sample of employed women in the Dutch Socio-Economic Panel (1987-1989) shows, however, that the flexibility of working hours within jobs is low. Job mobility is a means of adjustment in working hours mainly for women who want to work more hours.

Suggested Citation

  • Euwals, Rob, 1999. "Female Labour Supply, Flexibility of Working Hours, and Job Mobility in the Netherlands," IZA Discussion Papers 83, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp83

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John C. Ham, 1982. "Estimation of a Labour Supply Model with Censoring Due to Unemployment and Underemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 49(3), pages 335-354.
    2. Gibbons, Robert & Katz, Lawrence F, 1991. "Layoffs and Lemons," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 351-380, October.
    3. Joseph G. Altonji & Christina H. Paxson, 1986. "Job Characteristics and Hours of Work," NBER Working Papers 1895, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Arthur van Soest & Isolde Woittiez & Arie Kapteyn, 1990. "Labor Supply, Income Taxes, and Hours Restrictions in the Netherlands," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(3), pages 517-558.
    5. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Euwals, Rob & Eymann, Angelika, 1999. "Portfolio Choice with Behavioral Decision Mechanisms," Papers 99-37, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    6. Rob Euwals & Bertrand Melenberg & Arthur van Soest, 1998. "Testing the predictive value of subjective labour supply data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 567-585.
    7. Dickens, William T & Lundberg, Shelly J, 1993. "Hours Restrictions and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(1), pages 169-192, February.
    8. Axel Borsch-Supan & Daniel L. McFadden & Reinhold Schnabel, 1996. "Living Arrangements: Health and Wealth Effects," NBER Chapters,in: Advances in the Economics of Aging, pages 193-216 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Euwals, Rob & Eymann, Angelika, 1999. "Portfolio Choice with Behavioral Decision Mechanisms," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 99-37, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    10. Gourieroux, Christian & Monfort, Alain, 1993. "Simulation-based inference : A survey with special reference to panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 5-33, September.
    11. Blundell, Richard & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388a), pages 44-64, Supplemen.
    12. Moffitt, Robert, 1982. "The Tobit Model, Hours of Work and Institutional Constraints," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(3), pages 510-515, August.
    13. Joseph G. Altonji & Christina H. Paxson, 1992. "Labor Supply, Hours Constraints, and Job Mobility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(2), pages 256-278.
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    More about this item


    job mobility; hours restrictions; Labour supply;

    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General


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