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Validation of the discrete choice labor supply model by methods of the new tax responsiveness literature

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  • Thoresen, Thor O.
  • Vattø, Trine E.

Abstract

The static structural discrete choice labor supply model continues to be a workhorse in the process of policy-making, extensively used by policy-makers to predict labor supply effects of changes in the personal income tax system. A widely used alternative to obtain estimates of individual tax responsiveness is to exploit the diversity of tax treatment generated by a tax reform to recover tax induced outcome differences in data. Response estimates obtained from analysis of tax reforms are less useful for describing effects of prospective policies, but represent an underexploited source of information for out-of-sample validation of labor supply models. The present study describes how estimates of responses in working hours and income, generated from a tax reform, can be used to validate a discrete choice labor supply model; thus, bringing together and providing guidance to how results of two main avenues of obtaining estimates of tax responsiveness can be compared and interpreted. We find that the discrete choice model used by Norwegian policy-makers performs well as measured by this type of validation.

Suggested Citation

  • Thoresen, Thor O. & Vattø, Trine E., 2015. "Validation of the discrete choice labor supply model by methods of the new tax responsiveness literature," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 38-53.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:37:y:2015:i:c:p:38-53
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2015.09.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Neisser, Carina, 2017. "The elasticity of taxable income: A meta-regression analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-032, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Oguzhan Akgun & David Bartolini & Boris Cournède, 2017. "The capacity of governments to raise taxes," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1407, OECD Publishing.
    3. Creedy, John & Gemmell, Norman & Hérault, Nicolas & Mok, Penny, 2018. "Microsimulation Analysis of Optimal Income Tax Reforms. An Application to New Zealand," GLO Discussion Paper Series 213, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Kristoffer Berg & Thor O. Thoresen, 2016. "Problematic response margins in the estimation of the elasticity of taxable income," Discussion Papers 851, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. BARGAIN Olivier & DOORLEY Karina, 2016. "The Effect of Social Benefits on Youth Employment: Combining RD and a Behavioral Model," LISER Working Paper Series 2016-12, LISER.
    6. Thor O. Thoresen & Trine Engh Vattø, 2017. "An Up-to-Date Joint Labor Supply and Child Care Choice Model," CESifo Working Paper Series 6641, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. repec:kap:jecinq:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9369-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Zhiyang Jia & Trine E. Vattø, 2016. "The path of labor supply adjustment. Sources of lagged responses to tax-benefit reforms," Discussion Papers 854, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

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