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Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Job Opportunities. A Practical Empirical Approach

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Abstract

In this paper, we discuss aspects of a particular framework for modeling labor supply and the application of this approach in practical policy simulation experiments. This modeling framework differs from the standard models of labor supply in that the notion of job choice is fundamental. Specifically, the worker is assumed to have preferences over a latent worker-specific choice set of jobs from which he or she chooses his or her preferred job. A job is characterized with fixed (job-specific) working hours and other non-pecuniary attributes. As a result, observed hours of work are interpreted as the job-specific (fixed) hours of work that is associated with the chosen job. We then show that our framework is practical with respect to applications in empirical analysis and simulation experiments, and is able to produce satisfactory out-of-sample predictions by estimating the model on Norwegian microdata from 1997 and predicting the corresponding microdata from 2003.

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  • John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2006. "Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Job Opportunities. A Practical Empirical Approach," Discussion Papers 481, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:481
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    File URL: http://www.ssb.no/a/publikasjoner/pdf/DP/dp481.pdf
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    1. Dickens, William T & Lundberg, Shelly J, 1993. "Hours Restrictions and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 34(1), pages 169-192, February.
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    4. Steinar StrØm & John K. Dagsvik, 2006. "Sectoral labour supply, choice restrictions and functional form," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 803-826.
    5. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
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    10. John K. Dagsvik & Anders Karlström, 2005. "Compensating Variation and Hicksian Choice Probabilities in Random Utility Models that are Nonlinear in Income," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 57-76.
    11. Zhiyang Jia, 2005. "Labor Supply of Retiring Couples and Heterogeneity in Household Decision-Making Structure," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 215-233, June.
    12. Aasness, Jorgen & Bye, Torstein & Mysen, Hans Terje, 1996. "Welfare effects of emission taxes in Norway," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 335-346, October.
    13. Ilmakunnas, Seija & Pudney, Stephen, 1990. "A model of female labour supply in the presence of hours restrictions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 183-210, March.
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    15. Kapteyn, Arie & Kooreman, Peter & van Soest, Arthur, 1990. "Quantity Rationing and Concavity in a Flexible Household Labor Supply Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(1), pages 55-62, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2016. "Labor Supply as a Choice Among Latent Jobs: Unobserved Heterogeneity and Identification," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(3), pages 487-506, April.
    2. Iskhakov, Fedor, 2008. "Dynamic Programming Model of Health and Retirement," Memorandum 03/2008, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    3. Thor O. Thoresen & Jørgen Aasness & Zhiyang Jia, 2008. "More realistic estimates of revenue changes from tax cuts," Discussion Papers 545, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2014. "Labor supply as a discrete choice among latent jobs: Unobserved heterogeneity and identification," Discussion Papers 786, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2012. "Labor supply as a discrete choice among latent jobs," Discussion Papers 709, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    6. John Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia & Kristian Orsini & Guy Camp, 2011. "Subsidies on low-skilled workers’ social security contributions: the case of Belgium," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 779-806, May.
    7. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2008. "An Alternative Approach to Labor Supply Modeling. Emphasizing Job-type as Choice Variable," Discussion Papers 550, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor supply; non-pecuniary job attributes; non-convex budget sets; latent choice sets; random utility models.;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation

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