IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Simulating labor supply behaviour when workers have preferences over job opportunities and face non-linear budget constraints


  • John K. Dagsvik


  • Marilena Locatelli


  • Steinar Strøm



A female labor supplied model including sectoral choice, estimated on data from Norway, 1994 has been used in simulation to yield labor supply elasticities. We find that these elasticities are declining with the wage level of the women. The overall elasticities are rather small, but these small elasticities shadow for much stronger sectoral responses. A wage increase gives the women an incentive to shift labor supply from the public to the private sector. This occurs despite the fact that education and experiences have a slightly higher return in the public than in the private sector. The reasons for our result are that in the private sector wages are more dispersed and hours are less regulated. Marginal tax rates were cut considerably in the 1992 tax reform. We find that the impact on overall labor supply is rather modest, but again these modest changes shadow for stronger sectoral changes. The tax reform stimulated the women to shift their labor from the public to the private sector and to work longer hours. A calculation of the expected value of changes in household welfare shows that the richest households benefited far more from the 1992 tax reform than the poorest household.

Suggested Citation

  • John K. Dagsvik & Marilena Locatelli & Steinar Strøm, 2006. "Simulating labor supply behaviour when workers have preferences over job opportunities and face non-linear budget constraints," CHILD Working Papers wp01_06, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpc:wplist:wp01_06

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. McFadden, Daniel L., 1984. "Econometric analysis of qualitative response models," Handbook of Econometrics,in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 24, pages 1395-1457 Elsevier.
    2. John K. Dagsvik & Anders Karlström, 2005. "Compensating Variation and Hicksian Choice Probabilities in Random Utility Models that are Nonlinear in Income," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 57-76.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Bart Capéau & André Decoster & Gijs Dekkers, 2016. "Estimating and Simulating with a Random Utility Random Opportunity Model of Job Choice Presentation and Application to Belgium," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 9(2), pages 144-191.
    2. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2006. "Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Job Opportunities. A Practical Empirical Approach," Discussion Papers 481, Statistics Norway, Research Department.

    More about this item


    Labor supply; married females; structural model; sectoral choice; wage ealsticities; evaluation of tax reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpc:wplist:wp01_06. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Giovanni Bert). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.