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Welfare Effects of Emission Taxes in Norway

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Abstract

The welfare effects of introducing taxes on emissions of carbon dioxide is analysed within an empirical general equilibrium model of the Norwegian economy. A CO2 tax regime where we aim at stabilising the CO2 emissions at the 1990 emission level in 2020 is compared to a reference scenario without such taxes. In the simulations introduction of CO2 taxes reduces gross domestic product, but increases net national real disposable income, private consumption and money metric utility. This difference in sign is due to a positive terms of trade effect, some of the CO2 taxes will be paid by foreigners through exports. The welfare effects differ from household to household depending on the composition of their total consumption. Poor households are less favourably affected than rich households, due to smaller budget shares for the rich households on consumer goods which imply relatively much CO2 emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jørgen Aasness & Torstein Bye & Hans Terje Mysen, 1995. "Welfare Effects of Emission Taxes in Norway," Discussion Papers 148, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:148
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    1. Jorgenson, D.W. & Wilcoxen, P.J., 1992. "Reducing US Carbon Dioxide Emissions: An Assessment of Different Instruments," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1590, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Turid Åvitsland & Jørgen Aasness, 2004. "Combining CGE and microsimulation models: Effects on equality of VAT reforms," Discussion Papers 392, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Jørgen Aasness & Odd Erik Nygård, 2009. "Revenue functions and Dupuit curves for indirect taxes with cross-border shopping," Discussion Papers 573, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Fred Schroyen & Jørgen Aasness, 2006. "Marginal indirect tax reform analysis with merit good arguments and environmental concerns: Norway, 1999," Discussion Papers 455, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. Pizer, William A. & Kopp, Raymond, 2005. "Calculating the Costs of Environmental Regulation," Handbook of Environmental Economics,in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 25, pages 1307-1351 Elsevier.
    5. Lin, Boqiang & Li, Xuehui, 2011. "The effect of carbon tax on per capita CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5137-5146, September.
    6. Govinda Timilsina & Ram Shrestha, 2002. "General equilibrium analysis of economic and environmental effects of carbon tax in a developing country: case of Thailand," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 5(3), pages 179-211, September.
    7. Sverre Grepperud, 1997. "Soil Depletion Choices under Production and Price Uncertainty," Discussion Papers 186, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    8. Bruvoll, Annegrete & Larsen, Bodil Merethe, 2004. "Greenhouse gas emissions in Norway: do carbon taxes work?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 493-505, March.
    9. John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2006. "Labor Supply as a Choice among Latent Job Opportunities. A Practical Empirical Approach," Discussion Papers 481, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    10. Brita Bye & Snorre Kverndokk & Knut Rosendahl, 2002. "Mitigation costs, distributional effects, and ancillary benefits of carbon policies in the Nordic countries, the U.K., and Ireland," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 339-366, December.
    11. Pezzey, John C.V., 2001. "Distributing the Value of a Country’s Tradeable Carbon Permits," 2001 Conference (45th), January 23-25, 2001, Adelaide 125832, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    12. Kverndokk,S. & Rosendahl,E., 2000. "CO2 mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland : a survey," Memorandum 34/2000, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    13. Turid Avitsland & Jorgen Aasness, 2006. "Combining microsimulation and CGE models: Effects on equality of VAT reforms," Computing in Economics and Finance 2006 132, Society for Computational Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CO2 taxes; general equilibrium model; money metric welfare; terms of trade;

    JEL classification:

    • E1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models
    • H3 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy

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