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Neutral carbon tax and environmental targets in Brazil

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  • Paula Pereda

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  • Andrea Lucchesi, Carolina Policarpo Garcia, Bruno Toni Palialol

Abstract

We evaluate the effects of a carbon tax in the Brazilian economy using an input-output framework. First, we consider the impacts of a carbon tax of US$ 10 and US$ 50/metric ton of CO2 equivalent. As usual, the adoption of the carbon tax generates adverse effects on GDP, wages and jobs in the short term, but reduces emissions and generates new government revenues, especially in the case of the greater tax. Second, we consider a broader tax system reform. In this reform, we replace distortionary taxes by a tax on value added. To compensate for the loss of government revenue, we assume a carbon tax with equivalent revenue. We find that the net effect is a GDP increase of 0.47%, the creation of 533 thousand jobs and reduction of 1.6 million tons of CO2 emissions. Both scenarios exempt exports and levy imports to correct adverse effects on the country’s competitiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Paula Pereda & Andrea Lucchesi, Carolina Policarpo Garcia, Bruno Toni Palialol, 2019. "Neutral carbon tax and environmental targets in Brazil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2019_02, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
  • Handle: RePEc:spa:wpaper:2019wpecon02
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    carbon tax; input-output analysis; revenue-recycling effect; neutral tax burden;

    JEL classification:

    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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