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CO2 mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland : a survey

Author

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  • Kverndokk,S.
  • Rosendahl,E.

    (University of Oslo, Department of Economics)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Kverndokk,S. & Rosendahl,E., 2000. "CO2 mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland : a survey," Memorandum 34/2000, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:osloec:2000_034
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sv.uio.no/econ/english/research/unpublished-works/working-papers/pdf-files/2000/Memo-34-2000.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Snorre Kverndokk & Lars Lindholt & Knut Rosendahl, 2000. "Stabilization of CO 2 concentrations: mitigation scenarios using the Petro model," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 3(2), pages 195-224, June.
    2. Hahn, R.W. & Stavins, R.N., 1990. "Incentive-Based Environmental Regulation: A New Era From An Old Idea?," Papers 183d, Harvard - J.F. Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Andrew Dean & Peter Hoeller, 1992. "Costs of Reducing CO2 Emissions: Evidence from Six Global Models," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 122, OECD Publishing.
    4. Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik, 1998. "Integrating the bottom-up and top-down approach to energy-economy modelling: the case of Denmark," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 443-461, September.
    5. Cathal O'Donoghue, 1997. "Carbon Dioxide, Energy Taxes and Household Income," Papers WP090, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Nilsson, Charlotta & Huhtala, Anni, 2000. "Is CO2 Trading Always Beneficial? A CGE-Model Analysis on Secondary Environmental Benefits," Working Papers 75, National Institute of Economic Research.
    7. Anne Brendemoen & Haakon Vennemo, 1994. "A Climate Treaty and the Norwegian Economy: A CGE Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 77-93.
    8. Knut Alfsen & Hugo Birkelund & Morten Aaserud, 1995. "Impacts of an EC carbon/energy tax and deregulating thermal power supply on CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x emissions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(2), pages 165-189, March.
    9. Brita Bye & Karine Nyborg, 1999. "The Welfare Effects of Carbon Policies: Grandfathered Quotas versus Differentiated Taxes," Discussion Papers 261, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    10. Terry Barker & Jonathan Köhler, 1998. "Equity and ecotax reform in the EU: achieving a 10 per cent reduction in CO2 emissions using excise duties," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 19(4), pages 375-402, November.
    11. Aasness, Jorgen & Bye, Torstein & Mysen, Hans Terje, 1996. "Welfare effects of emission taxes in Norway," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 335-346, October.
    12. Elin Berg & Snorre Kverndokk & Knut Einar Rosendahl, 1996. "Market Power, International CO2 Taxation and Petroleum Wealth," Discussion Papers 170, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    13. Cathrine Hagem, 1994. "Cost-Effective Climate Policy in a Small Country," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 119-140.
    14. Parry, Ian W. H., 1997. "Environmental taxes and quotas in the presence of distorting taxes in factor markets," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 203-220, August.
    15. Ekins, Paul, 1996. "How large a carbon tax is justified by the secondary benefits of CO2 abatement?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-187, June.
    16. Lawrence Goulder, 1995. "Environmental taxation and the double dividend: A reader's guide," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 2(2), pages 157-183, August.
    17. Elizabeth Symons & John Proops & Philip Gay, 1994. "Carbon taxes, consumer demand and carbon dioxide emissions: a simulation analysis for the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 19-43, May.
    18. Barker, Terry & Baylis, Susan & Madsen, Peter, 1993. "A UK carbon/energy tax : The macroeconomics effects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 296-308, March.
    19. Bovenberg, A Lans & de Mooij, Ruud A, 1997. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 252-253, March.
    20. FitzGerald, John & McCoy, Daniel, 1992. "The Economic Effects of Carbon Taxes," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS14.
    21. A. Bovenberg & Frederick Van der Ploeg, 1998. "Consequences of Environmental Tax Reform for Unemployment and Welfare," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(2), pages 137-150, September.
    22. Goulder Lawrence H., 1995. "Effects of Carbon Taxes in an Economy with Prior Tax Distortions: An Intertemporal General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 271-297, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nilsson, Charlotta & Huhtala, Anni, 2000. "Is CO2 Trading Always Beneficial? A CGE-Model Analysis on Secondary Environmental Benefits," Working Papers 75, National Institute of Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    double dividend;

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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