IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Climate Treaty and the Norwegian Economy: A CGE Assessment


  • Anne Brendemoen
  • Haakon Vennemo


This paper examines the impact of an international climate treaty on 61 single country-Norway. A disaggregate computable general equilibrium (CGE), model is used. We discuss the treaty's effects on main macroeconomic indicators, economic growth, distributional impacts, the impact on pollutant emissions other than CO2 and the secondary benefits of this reduction. The results suggest that CO2 emissions will decrease compared to the current level, The distributional impacts are modest. Increases in secondary benefits recoup almost one half of the loss in private consumption. We characterize the uncertainty of this estimate.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Brendemoen & Haakon Vennemo, 1994. "A Climate Treaty and the Norwegian Economy: A CGE Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 77-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1994v15-01-a05

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to IAEE members and subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hendry, David F, 1986. "Econometric Modelling with Cointegrated Variables: An Overview," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 48(3), pages 201-212, August.
    2. Campbell, John Y. & Shiller, Robert J., 1988. "Interpreting cointegrated models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 505-522.
    3. Granger, Clive W J, 1986. "Developments in the Study of Cointegrated Economic Variables," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 48(3), pages 213-228, August.
    4. Walls, W. David, 1993. "A Cointegration Rank Test of Market Linkages with an Application to the U.S. Natural Gas Industry," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6sj0961h, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
    6. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
    7. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Terry Barker & Susan Baylis & Clare Bryden, 1994. "Achieving the Rio target: CO2 abatement through fiscal policy in the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(3), pages 1-18, August.
    2. Juin-Jen Chang & Jhy-Hwa Chen & Jhy-Yuan Shieh & Ching-Chong Lai, 2009. "Optimal Tax Policy, Market Imperfections, and Environmental Externalities in a Dynamic Optimizing Macro Model," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(4), pages 623-651, August.
    3. Holmøy, Erling, 2016. "The development and use of CGE models in Norway," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 448-474.
    4. Milan Ščasný & Emanuele Massetti & Jan Melichar & Samuel Carrara, 2015. "Quantifying the Ancillary Benefits of the Representative Concentration Pathways on Air Quality in Europe," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(2), pages 383-415, October.
    5. Brita Bye & Snorre Kverndokk & Knut Rosendahl, 2002. "Mitigation costs, distributional effects, and ancillary benefits of carbon policies in the Nordic countries, the U.K., and Ireland," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 339-366, December.
    6. Lars Håkonsen & Lars Mathiesen, 1997. "CO 2 -stabilization may be a ‘no-regrets’ policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(2), pages 171-198, March.
    7. Cabalu, Helen & Koshy, Paul & Corong, Erwin & Rodriguez, U-Primo E. & Endriga, Benjamin A., 2015. "Modelling the impact of energy policies on the Philippine economy: Carbon tax, energy efficiency, and changes in the energy mix," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 222-237.
    8. Bye, Brita, 2000. "Environmental Tax Reform and Producer Foresight: An Intertemporal Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 719-752, November.
    9. Lans Bovenberg, A. & de Mooij, Ruud A., 1997. "Environmental tax reform and endogenous growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 207-237, January.
    10. Hettich, Frank & Svane, Minna Selene, 1998. "Environmental policy in a two sector endogenous growth model," Discussion Papers, Series I 290, University of Konstanz, Department of Economics.
    11. Bodil Larsen & Runa Nesbakken, 1997. "Norwegian emissions of CO 2 1987–1994," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(3), pages 275-290, April.
    12. Kverndokk,S. & Rosendahl,E., 2000. "CO2 mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland : a survey," Memorandum 34/2000, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    13. Bodil Larsen, 1997. "Economic impacts of reducing NO x emissions in Norway," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(1), pages 125-132, January.
    14. Grepperud, Sverre & Rasmussen, Ingeborg, 2004. "A general equilibrium assessment of rebound effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 261-282, March.
    15. Markandya Anil & Rübbelke Dirk T.G., 2004. "Ancillary Benefits of Climate Policy / Sekundäre Nutzen der Klimapolitik," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 224(4), pages 488-503, August.
    16. Chen Jhy-hwa & Shieh Jhy-yuan & Chang Juin-jen, 2015. "Environmental policy and economic growth: the macroeconomic implications of the health effect," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(1), pages 1-31, January.
    17. Vennemo, Haakon, 1997. "A dynamic applied general equilibrium model with environmental feedbacks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 99-154, January.
    18. Bruvoll, Annegrete & Larsen, Bodil Merethe, 2004. "Greenhouse gas emissions in Norway: do carbon taxes work?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 493-505, March.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1994v15-01-a05. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (David Williams). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.