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Integrating the bottom-up and top-down approach to energy-economy modelling: the case of Denmark

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  • Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

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  • Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik, 1998. "Integrating the bottom-up and top-down approach to energy-economy modelling: the case of Denmark," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 443-461, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:20:y:1998:i:4:p:443-461
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik & Morthorst, Poul Erik & Nielsen, Lise & Stephensen, Peter, 1996. "Sammenkobling af makroøkonomiske og teknisk-økonomiske modeller for energisektoren. Hybris [Integration of bottom-up and top-down models for the energy system: A practical case for Denmark]," MPRA Paper 65676, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Hourcade, Jean-Charles & Robinson, John, 1996. "Mitigating factors : Assessing the costs of reducing GHG emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(10-11), pages 863-873.
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