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Economic and Technological Models for Evaluation of Energy Policy


  • Kenneth C. Hoffman
  • Dale W. Jorgenson


Models for energy policy assessment have been developed using both process analysis and econometrics. The process approach provides for the incorporation of information on future technological and structural changes based on detailed engineering studies. The econometric approach is well adapted to the description of aggressive consumer behavior and economic activity. This paper presents a new approach for policy assessment, integrating process analysis and econometric models that have been used extensively in energy policy analysis and technology assessment. We illustrate the application of this approach by an analysis of a national research, development, and demonstration plan for the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth C. Hoffman & Dale W. Jorgenson, 1977. "Economic and Technological Models for Evaluation of Energy Policy," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 8(2), pages 444-466, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:rje:bellje:v:8:y:1977:i:autumn:p:444-466

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Edwin Mansfield & John Rapoport & Anthony Romeo & Samuel Wagner & George Beardsley, 1977. "Social and Private Rates of Return from Industrial Innovations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(2), pages 221-240.
    2. Mansfield, Edwin, 1980. "Basic Research and Productivity Increase in Manufacturing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 863-873, December.
    3. Berndt, Ernst R & Christensen, Laurits R, 1974. "Testing for the Existence of a Consistent Aggregate Index of Labor Inputs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(3), pages 391-404, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mukherjee, Shishir K., 1981. "Energy policy and planning in India," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 6(8), pages 823-851.
    2. Rahman, Md. Mizanur & Paatero, Jukka V. & Lahdelma, Risto & A. Wahid, Mazlan, 2016. "Multicriteria-based decision aiding technique for assessing energy policy elements-demonstration to a case in Bangladesh," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 237-244.
    3. repec:eee:rensus:v:75:y:2017:i:c:p:21-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Milad Maralani & Milad Maralani & Basil Sharp & Golbon Zakeri, 2016. "The Potential Impact of Industrial Energy Savings on The New Zealand Economy," EcoMod2016 9308, EcoMod.
    5. Clinch, J. Peter & Healy, John D., 2003. "Valuing improvements in comfort from domestic energy-efficiency retrofits using a trade-off simulation model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 565-583, September.
    6. Maryse Labriet & Laurent Drouet & Marc Vielle & Richard Loulou & Amit Kanudia & Alain Haurie, 2015. "Assessment of the Effectiveness of Global Climate Policies Using Coupled Bottom-up and Top-down Models," Working Papers 2015.23, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    7. Nic Rivers & Mark Jaccard, 2005. "Combining Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches to Energy-Economy Modeling Using Discrete Choice Methods," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 83-106.
    8. Walter Labys, 2005. "Commodity Price Fluctuations: A Century of Analysis," Working Papers Working Paper 2005-01, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.
    9. Matar, Walid & Murphy, Frederic & Pierru, Axel & Rioux, Bertrand, 2015. "Lowering Saudi Arabia's fuel consumption and energy system costs without increasing end consumer prices," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 558-569.
    10. Lanz, Bruno & Rausch, Sebastian, 2011. "General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 1035-1047, September.
    11. Gauthier de Maere d'Aertrycke & Olivier Durand-Lasserve & Marco Schudel, 2014. "Integration of Power Generation Capacity Expansion in an Applied General Equilibrium Model," Working Papers 2014.71, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    12. Henrik Jacobsen, 2000. "Modelling a sector undergoing structural change: The case of Danish energy supply," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 97(1), pages 231-247, December.
    13. repec:rri:wpaper:200501 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Rose, Adam & Kolk, David & Brady, Michael & Kneisel, Robert, 1981. "Energy development and urban employment creation: The case of the city of Los Angeles," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 6(10), pages 1041-1052.
    15. Laha, Priyanka & Chakraborty, Basab, 2017. "Energy model – A tool for preventing energy dysfunction," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 95-114.

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