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Carbon Dioxide, Energy Taxes and Household Income

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  • Cathal O'Donoghue

    (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of a carbon tax on the income distribution in Ireland using the 1987 Household Budget Survey. Previous studies have focused on the direct impact of the carbon tax on expenditures on domestic fuels. This study however, drawing on previous work expands the analysis to cover the indirect impact of carbon taxes on other household purchases> A direct and indirect tax would have a less regressive effect on the income distribution than a simple direct tax on household fuel expenditures. A consumer demand system was in addition used to determine the behavioural response to a number of reforms, including a tax only on industrial fuel purchases and a revenue neutral direct and indirect tax, where revenues were redistributed via a flat payment.

Suggested Citation

  • Cathal O'Donoghue, 1997. "Carbon Dioxide, Energy Taxes and Household Income," Papers WP090, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp090
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    File URL: https://www.esri.ie/pubs/WP090.pdf
    File Function: First version, 1997
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Distributional implications of a carbon tax
      by Richard Tol in The Irish Economy on 2009-09-21 19:15:10

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    2. Kverndokk,S. & Rosendahl,E., 2000. "CO2 mitigation costs and ancillary benefits in the Nordic countries, the UK and Ireland : a survey," Memorandum 34/2000, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

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