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The Proposals for a European Tax on CO 2 and Their Implications for Intercountry Distribution

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  • Emilio Padilla

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  • Jordi Roca

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Abstract

This paper analyzes the advantages andimplications of the implementation of aEuropean tax on carbon dioxide emissions as anown resource of the EU and it focuses on itseffects on intercountry distribution. Incontrast to a harmonized tax, which would onlyhave distributive effects within each memberstate, a tax collected at European scale wouldalso have important distributive effects amongdifferent countries. These effects would alsodepend on the use of tax revenues. The paperinvestigates through a simple empiricalanalysis the distributive effects among themember states of three tax models: a pureCO 2 model; a 50%/50% energy-CO 2 model and a CO 2 model with a burden onnuclear power. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Emilio Padilla & Jordi Roca, 2004. "The Proposals for a European Tax on CO 2 and Their Implications for Intercountry Distribution," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 27(3), pages 273-295, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:27:y:2004:i:3:p:273-295
    DOI: 10.1023/B:EARE.0000017654.74722.23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rocchi, Paola & Serrano, Mònica & Roca, Jordi, 2014. "The reform of the European energy tax directive: Exploring potential economic impacts in the EU27," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 341-353.
    2. Duro, Juan Antonio & Padilla, Emilio, 2006. "International inequalities in per capita CO2 emissions: A decomposition methodology by Kaya factors," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 170-187, March.
    3. Wang, Qian & Hubacek, Klaus & Feng, Kuishuang & Wei, Yi-Ming & Liang, Qiao-Mei, 2016. "Distributional effects of carbon taxation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 1123-1131.

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