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Combining input-output analysis and micro-simulation to assess the effects of carbon taxation on Spanish households

  • Xavier Labandeira
  • José M. Labeaga

This paper explores the effects of a tax levied on Spanish energy-related CO2 emissions. After justifying the relevance of carbon taxation in the Spanish context, we consider the introduction of a product (fossil-fuel) tax with a rate obtained through the ‘actual damage cost’ method. Our empirical analysis proceeds in two stages. First, we employ an input-output demand model to calculate the price changes after the introduction of carbon taxation. In a second stage, simulation with Spanish household micro-data for 1994 yields the environmental and economic effects of a Spanish carbon tax. We find a limited short-run reaction to the carbon tax, which hampers its environmental success. The carbon tax burden is, however, significant, with a proportional distribution across households.

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Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 20 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 305-320

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:20:y:1999:i:3:p:305-320
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  1. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  2. Banks, James & Blundell, Richard & Lewbel, Arthur, 1996. "Tax Reform and Welfare Measurement: Do We Need Demand System Estimation?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1227-41, September.
  3. Samuel Fankhauser, 1994. "The Social Costs of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: An Expected Value Approach," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 157-184.
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