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Are CO2 taxes regressive? Evidence from the Danish experience

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  • Wier, Mette
  • Birr-Pedersen, Katja
  • Jacobsen, Henrik Klinge
  • Klok, Jacob

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  • Wier, Mette & Birr-Pedersen, Katja & Jacobsen, Henrik Klinge & Klok, Jacob, 2005. "Are CO2 taxes regressive? Evidence from the Danish experience," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 239-251, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:52:y:2005:i:2:p:239-251
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Walls, Margaret & Hanson, Jean, 1996. "Distributional Impacts of an Environmental Tax Shift: The Case of Motor Vehicle Emissions Taxes," Discussion Papers 10895, Resources for the Future.
    2. Dorfman, Robert, 1979. "A Formula for the Gini Coefficient," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(1), pages 146-149, February.
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    8. Baranzini, Andrea & Goldemberg, Jose & Speck, Stefan, 2000. "A future for carbon taxes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 395-412, March.
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