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Effects of Household Consumption Patterns on CO2 Requirements

  • Mette Wier
  • Manfred Lenzen
  • Jesper Munksgaard
  • Sinne Smed

In order to evaluate the relation between the consumption pattern of various household types and their CO2 requirements, we combine input-output tables energy flow matrices, CO2 emissions factors, and national consumer survey statistics into an integrated modelling framework, and relate differences in household types to differences in private consumption and again to differences in CO2 emissions. We identify household characteristics with a significant influence on CO2 emissions. Comparing our results with those of other studies reveals that national differences in climate and population density cause differences in the contribution to CO2 emissions. Finally, national differences in income and expenditure elasticities of both energy and CO2 are due to differences in the disparity in CO2 intensities amongst commodities and to the model's assumptions on foreign technology.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economic Systems Research.

Volume (Year): 13 (2001)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 259-274

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:13:y:2001:i:3:p:259-274
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  1. Munksgaard, Jesper & Pedersen, Klaus Alsted & Wien, Mette, 2000. "Impact of household consumption on CO2 emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 423-440, August.
  2. Biesiot, Wouter & Noorman, Klaas Jan, 1999. "Energy requirements of household consumption: a case study of The Netherlands," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 367-383, March.
  3. Henrik Jacobsen, 2000. "Energy Demand, Structural Change and Trade: A Decomposition Analysis of the Danish Manufacturing Industry," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 319-343.
  4. Weber, Christoph & Perrels, Adriaan, 2000. "Modelling lifestyle effects on energy demand and related emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(8), pages 549-566, July.
  5. Herendeen, Robert & Tanaka, Jerry, 1976. "Energy cost of living," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 165-178.
  6. Harry Wilting & Wouter Biesiot & Henri Moll, 1999. "Analyzing Potentials for Reducing the Energy Requirement of Households in The Netherlands," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 233-244.
  7. Rolando Alcala & Gabrielle Antille & Emilio Fontela, 1999. "Technical Change in the Private Consumption Converter," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 389-400.
  8. Vringer, Kees & Blok, Kornelis, 1995. "The direct and indirect energy requirements of households in the Netherlands," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(10), pages 893-910, October.
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