IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/ecsysr/v11y1999i4p389-400.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Technical Change in the Private Consumption Converter

Author

Listed:
  • Rolando Alcala
  • Gabrielle Antille
  • Emilio Fontela

Abstract

The analysis of technological change is centered on the study of the evolution of technical coefficients in the input-output table. Complementary to this analysis, the household consumption expenditure matrix, relating consumption by commodities to consumption by purpose or by function, also incorporates some other aspects of technological change. Thus, the evolution in time of the coefficients of this consumption expenditure matrix will portray technological processes, implying substitutions between commodities to satisfy the different functions The substitution between consumption expenditure by functions is also to be taken into consideration, because it can influence, together with technological change, the use of commodities in the final demand. For Switzerland, a 1980-89 time series of household consumption expenditure matrices with 37 commodities and 58 functional consumption categories has been estimated using data from consumer expenditure surveys. In this paper, instruments generally applied to the analysis of changes in input-output technical coefficients are extended to these matrices, including methods that deal with biproportional processes of substitution.

Suggested Citation

  • Rolando Alcala & Gabrielle Antille & Emilio Fontela, 1999. "Technical Change in the Private Consumption Converter," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 389-400.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:11:y:1999:i:4:p:389-400
    DOI: 10.1080/09535319900000028
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09535319900000028
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 2000. "Structural Decomposition Analyses with Dependent Determinants," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 497-514.
    2. Mette Wier & Manfred Lenzen & Jesper Munksgaard & Sinne Smed, 2001. "Effects of Household Consumption Patterns on CO2 Requirements," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 259-274.
    3. Paul De Boer, 2008. "Additive Structural Decomposition Analysis and Index Number Theory: An Empirical Application of the Montgomery Decomposition," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 97-109.
    4. de Boer, P.M.C., 2006. "Structural decomposition analysis and index number theory: an empirical application of the Montgomery decomposition," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2006-39, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    5. Sikhanwita Roy & Tuhin Das & Debesh Chakraborty, 2002. "A Study on the Indian Information Sector: An Experiment with Input-Output Techniques," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 107-129, June.
    6. Aying Liu & David Saal, 2001. "Structural Change in Apartheid-era South Africa: 1975-93," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 235-257.
    7. Jan A van der Linden & Erik Dietzenbacher, 2000. "The determinants of structural change in the European Union: a new application of RAS," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(12), pages 2205-2229, December.
    8. Druckman, Angela & Buck, Ian & Hayward, Bronwyn & Jackson, Tim, 2012. "Time, gender and carbon: A study of the carbon implications of British adults' use of time," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 153-163.
    9. Dong Guo & Geoffrey Hewings & Michael Sonis, 2005. "Integrating decomposition approaches for the analysis of temporal changes in economic structure: an application to Chicago's economy from 1980 to 2000," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 297-315.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:11:y:1999:i:4:p:389-400. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CESR20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.