IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ntj/journl/v52y1999i1p53-65.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Distributional Aspects of an Environmental Tax Shift: The Case of Motor Vehicle Emissions Taxes

Author

Listed:
  • Walls, Margaret
  • Hanson, Jean

Abstract

Policymakers are beginning to appreciate the efficiency properties of pollution taxes, but concerns over equity remain. In this paper, we assess the distributional aspects of three types of emissions fees for vehicles--a fee based on total annual emissions; a fee based on emissions rates, in grams per mile; and a fee based on annual vehicle mileage--and we compare the impacts of fees to existing vehicle registration fees. We find that all three of the emissions-related fees look quite a bit more regressive, on the basis of annual household income, than do existing registration fees. However, when we construct a lifetime income variable for our households, we find that the differential impacts of the three emissions-related fees over existing fees are quite small.

Suggested Citation

  • Walls, Margaret & Hanson, Jean, 1999. "Distributional Aspects of an Environmental Tax Shift: The Case of Motor Vehicle Emissions Taxes," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 52(1), pages 53-65, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:52:y:1999:i:1:p:53-65
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/52/1/ntj-v52n01p53-65-distributional-aspects-environmental-tax.pdf
    Download Restriction: Access to most recent volumes (current and past two years) is restricted to subscribers and members of the National Tax Association.

    File URL: https://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/52/1/ntj-v52n01p53-65-distributional-aspects-environmental-tax.html
    Download Restriction: Access to most recent volumes (current and past two years) is restricted to subscribers and members of the National Tax Association.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Poterba, James M, 1989. "Lifetime Incidence and the Distributional Burden of Excise Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 325-330, May.
    2. Bovenberg, A Lans & Goulder, Lawrence H, 1996. "Optimal Environmental Taxation in the Presence of Other Taxes: General-Equilibrium Analyses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 985-1000, September.
    3. Barthold, Thomas A., 1993. "How Should We Measure Distribution?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 46(3), pages 291-99, September.
    4. Bovenberg, A.L. & Goulder, L.H., 1996. "Optimal environmental taxation in the presence of other taxes : General equilibrium analyses," Other publications TiSEM 5d4b7517-c5c8-4ef6-ab76-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    5. Barthold, Thomas A., 1993. "How Should We Measure Distribution?," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 46(3), pages 291-299, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca S. & Wilen, James E., 2010. "Optimal control of spatial-dynamic processes: The case of biological invasions," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61375, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Albrecht, Johan, 2006. "The use of consumption taxes to re-launch green tax reforms," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 88-103, March.
    3. Hickson, Allister, 2006. "Motor vehicle insurance rating with pseudo emissions coverage," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 146-159, June.
    4. Yasser Ammar AL-Rawi & Mohammed Harith Imlus & Yusri Yusup & Sofri Bin Yahya, 2018. "The Optimal Progressive Tax Policy to Reduced Vehicles Externalities," Journal of Asian Scientific Research, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 8(8), pages 265-276, August.
    5. Blackman, Allen & Osakwe, Rebecca & Alpizar, Francisco, 2010. "Fuel tax incidence in developing countries: The case of Costa Rica," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2208-2215, May.
    6. Alvarez, Maximiliano, 2019. "Distributional effects of environmental taxation: An approximation with a meta-regression analysis," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 382-401.
    7. Parry, Ian & Walls, Margaret & Sigman, Hilary & Williams III, Roberton, 2005. "The Incidence of Pollution Control Policies," Discussion Papers dp-05-24, Resources For the Future.
    8. Parry, Ian W. H., 2004. "Are emissions permits regressive?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 364-387, March.
    9. Ian Parry, 2015. "Carbon Tax Burdens on Low-Income Households: A Reason for Delaying Climate Policy?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5482, CESifo Group Munich.
    10. Gonzalez, Fidel, 2012. "Distributional effects of carbon taxes: The case of Mexico," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 2102-2115.
    11. James R. Hines Jr., 2007. "Taxing Consumption and Other Sins," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 49-68, Winter.
    12. Sterner, Thomas, 2012. "Distributional effects of taxing transport fuel," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 75-83.
    13. Burtraw, Dallas & Sweeney, Richard & Walls, Margaret, 2008. "The Incidence of U.S. Climate Policy: Where You Stand Depends on Where You Sit," Discussion Papers dp-08-28, Resources For the Future.
    14. Antón-Sarabia, Arturo & Hernández-Trillo, Fausto, 2014. "Optimal gasoline tax in developing, oil-producing countries: The case of Mexico," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 564-571.
    15. Don Fullerton, 2008. "Distributional Effects of Environmental and Energy Policy: An Introduction," NBER Working Papers 14241, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Hammar, Henrik & Jagers, Sverker C., 2007. "What is a fair CO2 tax increase? On fair emission reductions in the transport sector," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2-3), pages 377-387, March.
    17. Henrik Klinge Jacobsen & Katja Birr-Pedersen & Mette Wier, 2003. "Distributional Implications of Environmental Taxation in Denmark," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 24(4), pages 477-499, December.
    18. Joshua Blonz & Dallas Burtraw & Margaret Walls, 2012. "Social safety nets and US climate policy costs," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 474-490, July.
    19. Tomohara, Akinori & Xue, Jian, 2009. "Motorcycles retirement program: Choosing the appropriate regulatory framework," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 126-129.
    20. McMullen, B. Starr & Zhang, Lei, 2007. "Is A Vehicle-Mile Tax a Viable Alternative to the Gasoline Tax? A Review of Socio-Economics and Distributional Considerations," 48th Annual Transportation Research Forum, Boston, Massachusetts, March 15-17, 2007 207933, Transportation Research Forum.
    21. West, Sarah E., 2004. "Distributional effects of alternative vehicle pollution control policies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3-4), pages 735-757, March.
    22. Garrone Giovanna, 2004. "Scrapping old cars for reducing air pollution: an environmental evaluation of the Italian 1997-1998 incentive policy," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 200404, University of Turin.
    23. Tscharaktschiew, Stefan, 2014. "Shedding light on the appropriateness of the (high) gasoline tax level in Germany," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 189-210.
    24. Wang, Qian & Hubacek, Klaus & Feng, Kuishuang & Wei, Yi-Ming & Liang, Qiao-Mei, 2016. "Distributional effects of carbon taxation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 1123-1131.
    25. Starr McMullen, B. & Zhang, Lei & Nakahara, Kyle, 2010. "Distributional impacts of changing from a gasoline tax to a vehicle-mile tax for light vehicles: A case study of Oregon," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 359-366, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:52:y:1999:i:1:p:53-65. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sally Sztrecska). General contact details of provider: https://www.ntanet.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.