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Postawy wzglêdem euro i ich determinanty– przegl¹d badañ i literatury przedmiotu

Author

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  • Joanna Osiñska

    () (Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics)

Abstract

Przyst¹pienie do strefy euro i zwi¹zane z nim wprowadzenie wspólnego europejskiego pieni¹dza do obiegu gotówkowego w miejsce waluty narodowej nie jest wy³¹cznie zjawiskiem ekonomicznym. Przeciwnie, jest to zjawisko wielodyscyplinarne – ekonomiczne, polityczne, a tak¿e psycho-spo³eczne. Poniewa¿ wprowadzenie euro ma potencjalny wp³yw na dobrobyt jednostek, bêd¹ one dokonywaæ jego oceny i w ten sposób krystalizowaæ siê bêd¹ ich postawy wobec nowego zjawiska. Artyku³ stanowi przegl¹d literatury dotycz¹cej determinant poparcia spo³ecznego dla euro. Postuluje on potrzebê dope³nienia oficjalnych dokumentów i raportów nt. integracji ze stref¹ euro, wœród których dominuj¹ ujêcia makroekonomiczne i dotycz¹ce tzw. aspektów praktycznych procesu wprowadzenia euro, o komplementarne spojrzenie z perspektywy psychologii pieni¹dza, uwzglêdniaj¹ce – oprócz ekonomicznych – tak¿e czynniki psycho-spo³eczne.

Suggested Citation

  • Joanna Osiñska, 2013. "Postawy wzglêdem euro i ich determinanty– przegl¹d badañ i literatury przedmiotu," Working Papers 70, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isd:wpaper:70
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    euro; postawy wzglêdem euro; UGW; integracja europejska; badania opinii publicznej.;

    JEL classification:

    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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