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Fertility and family policy in Norway - A reflection on trends and possible connections

Author

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  • Marit Rønsen

    (Statistisk sentralbyrå (Statistics Norway))

Abstract

Below replacement fertility in many countries has lead to a renewed public interest in policies that may encourage young people to have more children. The Nordic countries are sometimes in focus in this respect, as their fertility rates remain relatively high in spite of very high female labour force participation. The key question is therefore whether there is a connection between generous public policies that facilitate childbearing and employment, and fertility. Using Norway as example and reviewing existing research evidence I conclude that generous family policies may be necessary, but not sufficient, to sustain fertility at a reasonable level. In particular, adverse macroeconomic conditions and rising unemployment have counteracting effects, as demonstrated by falling fertility rates in Sweden in the mid-1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Marit Rønsen, 2004. "Fertility and family policy in Norway - A reflection on trends and possible connections," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(10), pages 265-286, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:10:y:2004:i:10
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol10/10/10-10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. FFF1Øystein NNN1Kravdal, 2004. "An Illustration of the Problems Caused by Incomplete Education Histories in Fertility Analyses," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(6), pages 135-154, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marit Rønsen & Kari Skrede, 2010. "Can public policies sustain fertility in the Nordic countries?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(13), pages 321-346, March.
    2. David Alich, 2006. "The third child: a comparison between West Germany and Norway," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Hill Kulu & Andres Vikat & Gunnar Andersson, 2006. "Settlement size and fertility in the Nordic countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-024, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Christian Hagist & Bernd Raffelhüschen & Alf Erling Risa & Erling Vårdal, 2013. "Long-Term Fiscal Effects of Public Pension Reform in Norway – A Generational Accounting Analysis," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 38, pages 1-2.
    5. World Bank, 2015. "Searching for a New Silver Age in Russia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22611, The World Bank.
    6. Anna Baranowska-Rataj & Anna Matysiak, 2012. "Czy znamy lekarstwo na nisk¹ dzietnoœæ? Wyniki miêdzynarodowych badañ ewaluacyjnych na temat polityki rodzinnej," Working Papers 47, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    7. Martin Klesment & Allan Puur, 2010. "Effects of education on second births before and after societal transition: Evidence from the Estonian GGS," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(28), pages 891-932, May.
    8. Ann-Zofie Duvander & Gunnar Andersson, 2005. "Gender Equality and Fertility in Sweden: A Study on the Impact of the Father’s Uptake of Parental Leave on Continued Childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    9. Gunnar Andersson, 2005. "A study on policies and practices in selected countries that encourage childbirth: the case of Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    10. Olivier Thevenon, 2009. "Does fertility respond to work and family reconciliation policies in France?," Working Papers hal-00424832, HAL.
    11. Jan M. Hoem & Gerda R. Neyer & Gunnar Andersson, 2005. "Childlessness and educational attainment among Swedish women born in 1955-59," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-014, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    family policy; female education; fertility; Norway;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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