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The third child: a comparison between West Germany and Norway

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  • David Alich

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to provide insights into third-birth dynamics in West Germany and Norway. Since the third-birth propensity between both countries differs remarkably, we seek to address the following questions in this paper: What are the characteristics of mothers with two and three children? What are the differences in third-birth dynamics between Norway and West Germany, and how can they be explained? Which factors have a similar influence on Norwegian and West German two-child mothers and their further fertility? We believe that a comparison of third-birth behavior between Norway and West Germany is of interest since the two nations are examples of two different European welfare state regimes. Therefore, they can serve as an example to point out the effects of socio-economic characteristics under different societal settings.

Suggested Citation

  • David Alich, 2006. "The third child: a comparison between West Germany and Norway," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2006-001
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2006-001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Larry Bumpass & Ronald Rindfuss & Richard Jamosik, 1978. "Age and marital status at first birth and the pace of subsequent fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(1), pages 75-86, February.
    2. Neyer, Gerda, 2003. "Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe," Discussion Paper 161, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Gunnar Andersson & Karsten Hank & Marit Rønsen & Andres Vikat, 2004. "Gendering the family composition: sex preferences for children and childbearing behavior in the Nordic countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-019, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Jan M. Hoem & Alexia Prskawetz & Gerda R. Neyer, 2001. "Autonomy or conservative adjustment? The effect of public policies and educational attainment on third births in Austria," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-016, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Øystein Kravdal, 2001. "The High Fertility of College Educated Women in Norway," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 5(6), pages 187-216, December.
    6. Marit Rønsen, 2004. "Fertility and family policy in Norway - A reflection on trends and possible connections," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(10), pages 265-286, June.
    7. Debra Friedman & Michael Hechter & Satoshi Kanazawa, 1994. "A theory of the value of children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(3), pages 375-401, August.
    8. Elizabeth Thomson, 1983. "Individual and couple utility of children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 20(4), pages 507-518, November.
    9. Karsten Hank & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2000. "Does the availability of childcare influence the employment of mothers? Findings from western Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2000-003, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    10. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Family policies and low fertility in Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Germany; Germany/FRG; Norway; Scandinavia; education; fertility; large family; welfare states;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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