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Das Bundeselterngeld- und Elternzeitgesetz in Deutschland: Analyse potenzieller Effekte auf Geburtenzahl und Fertilitätsstruktur

  • Reich, Nora

Am 1. Januar 2007 trat in Deutschland das Bundeselterngeld- und Elternzeitgesetz in Kraft. Ein Ziel dieser Neuausrichtung der Familienpolitik ist die Erhöhung der Gesamtfertilitätsrate. Diese liegt in Westdeutschland seit den 1970er Jahren zwischen durchschnittlich 1,3 und 1,5 Kindern pro Frau und damit deutlich unter dem Bestandserhaltungsniveau von 2,1. Um die potenzielle Wirkung des Gesetzes hierauf und auf die Fertilitätsstruktur abzuschätzen, werden in diesem Beitrag wirtschaftstheoretische Modelle über den Zusammenhang zwischen familienpolitischen Maßnahmen und der Fertilität evaluiert. Des Weiteren werden Erfahrungen anderer westeuropäischer Länder mit ähnlichen familienpolitischen Modellen analysiert. Hieraus werden Schlüsse für die potenziellen Wirkungen des deutschen Elterngeld- und Elternzeitmodells gezogen und Handlungsempfehlungen für weitere familienpolitische Schritte abgeleitet.

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Paper provided by Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI) in its series HWWI Policy Papers with number 1-10.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:hwwipp:110
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