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Low Fertility of Highly Educated Women: The Impact of Child Care Infrastructure

  • Schrage, Andrea

Most studies of the negative correlation between fertility and education treat education as exogenously raising wages and the cost of child rearing, thus reducing fertility. I relax these assumptions in two respects. First, child costs don't increase with the value of time when external child care is used. Second, over a lifetime, education is endogenous. I model women's choice of education, fertility, and form of child care, allowing for economies of scale in parental child care. Compatibility between work and family duties increases labor supply, the demand for children of educated women, and enhances incentives for obtaining education. Die meisten Untersuchungen über den negativen Zusammenhang zwischen Kinderzahl und Ausbildung behandeln den Bildungsstand als exogene Größe, welche den Lohn und damit die Kosten der Kinderbetreuungs erhöht und die Fertilität reduziert. Zwei Annahmen werden in diesem Papier gelockert. Erstens steigen die Kinderkosten nicht mit dem Wert der Zeit wenn externe Kinderbetreuung in Anspruch genommen werden. Zweitens ist das Bildungsniveau in einer Lebenszeitbetrachtung endogen. Ich modelliere die Entscheidung einer Frau über ihre Bildung, Fertilität und Kinderbetreuungsform. Dabei werden auch Skalenerträge in der häuslichen Kinderbetreuung berücksichtigt. Bessere Vereinbarkeit zwischen beruflichen und familiären Verpflichtungen erhöht das Arbeitsangebot, die Nachfrage gebildeter Frauen nach Kindern, und die Anreize in Bildung zu investieren.

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Paper provided by University of Regensburg, Department of Economics in its series University of Regensburg Working Papers in Business, Economics and Management Information Systems with number 421.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:bay:rdwiwi:789
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  1. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke, 2001. "Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters," UCLA Economics Working Papers 803, UCLA Department of Economics.
  2. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1993. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 4550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  13. Anna Christina D'Addio & Marco Mira d'Ercole, 2005. "Trends and Determinants of Fertility Rates: The Role of Policies," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 27, OECD Publishing.
  14. Christian Schmitt & Ulrike Winkelmann, 2005. "Wer bleibt kinderlos?: Sozialstrukturelle Daten zur Kinderlosigkeit von Frauen und Männern," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 473, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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  17. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2004. "Fertility, Taxation and Family Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(4), pages 745-763, December.
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