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Labour force participation and marital fertility of Italian women: The role of education

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  • Massimiliano Bratti

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Abstract

This paper uses data from the 1993 Survey of Household Income and Wealth conducted by the Bank of Italy in order to estimate a reduced form purist model of female marital fertility and labour force participation. It focuses in particular on the effect of formal education on both fertility and labour force participation, and accounts for the potential endogeneity of education. Our estimates show that increasing education up to the upper secondary level exerts ceteris paribus a positive effect on marital fertility at ages 21–39 and that highly educated women postpone fertility and have a higher labour market attachment. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Massimiliano Bratti, 2003. "Labour force participation and marital fertility of Italian women: The role of education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 525-554, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:16:y:2003:i:3:p:525-554
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-003-0142-5
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; fertility; Italy; labour force participation; women; J13; J22;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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