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Careers and Motherhood: Policies for Compatibility

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  • Dex, Shirley
  • Joshi, Heather

Abstract

This paper examines the economic issues relevant to policy debates that surround the increasing labour force participation of mothers. We review the main changes in women's labour market participation in Britain. The main source of increase in women's participation rates has come from mothers returning to work after childbirth after progressively shorter intervals. The major influences on this behaviour and the length of time spent out of work over the first childbirth and the associated empirical work are also reviewed. These changes have raised issues relevant to maternity and parental leave, childcare provision, employers' family-friendly working arrangements and children's welfare. The paper makes some recommendations about how to further gender equity in a form compatible with family life. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Dex, Shirley & Joshi, Heather, 1999. "Careers and Motherhood: Policies for Compatibility," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(5), pages 641-659, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:23:y:1999:i:5:p:641-59
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    Cited by:

    1. Massimiliano Bratti, 2003. "Labour force participation and marital fertility of Italian women: The role of education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(3), pages 525-554, August.
    2. Petersen, Trond & Penner, Andrew & Hogsnes, Geir, 2007. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty: Sorting Versus Differential Pay," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt9886p84f, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    3. Petersen, Trond & Penner, Andrew & Hogsnes, Geir, 2007. "From Motherhood Penalties to Fatherhood Premia: The New Challenge for Family Policy," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt9fw3f7vj, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    4. Vinod Mishra & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2006. "The Relationship Between Female Labour Force Participation And Fertility In G7 Countries: Evidence From Panel Cointegration And Granger Causality," Monash Economics Working Papers 13/06, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    5. Arnstein Aassve & Alice Goisis & Maria Sironi, 2012. "Happiness and Childbearing Across Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 108(1), pages 65-86, August.
    6. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2009. "Accommodating Families," Chapters,in: Labor and Employment Law and Economics, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Petersen, Trond & Penner, Andrew & Høgnes, Geir, 2012. "From Motherhood Penalties to Husband Premia: The New Challenge for Gender Equality and Family Policy, Lessons from Norway," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt60p7c2pg, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    8. Petersen, Trond & Penner, Andrew M & Høgsnes, Geir, 2014. "From Motherhood Penalties to Husband Premia: The New Challenge for Gender Equality and Family Policy, Lessons from Norway," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt2hk409sk, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    9. John Sender, 2000. "Struggles To Escape Poverty In South Africa: Results From A Purposive Rural Survey," Working Papers 107, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.

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