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Education, Teenage Fertility and Labour Market Participation, Evidence from Ecuador

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  • Anna de Paoli

    () (University of Milan Bicocca)

Abstract

Using a representative sample of Ecuadorian young women’s households, this paper focuses on the role played by education in shaping fertility choices and labor market participation. Education, which is found to be endogenous with respect to teenage childbearing, is instrumented by a reform that took place in 1977. Then, in a model where the choices to be a mother and to be in the labor force are considered simultaneously, we find evidence that schooling is positively related to wom-en’s labor market participation rate and negatively to early motherhood. The last section concludes stressing the potential intergenerational effects of changes in the age at first birth, showing that firstborn children born to older mothers have better educational outcomes than those born to young-er ones. We find that educational policies improve women’s conditions, lowering the risk of teenage childbearing and increasing labor market attachment.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna de Paoli, 2011. "Education, Teenage Fertility and Labour Market Participation, Evidence from Ecuador," Development Working Papers 319, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 17 Oct 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:319
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    2. Michael J. Peel, 2014. "Addressing unobserved endogeneity bias in accounting studies: control and sensitivity methods by variable type," Accounting and Business Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(5), pages 545-571, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    schooling; education policy; teenage fertility; labor force;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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