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The Evolution of Population, Technology and Output

  • Galindev, Ragchaasuren
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    This paper extends Galor and Weil's (2000) unified growth model on the evolution of population, technology and output by replacing the parental utility function in which consumption and children are unrelated, with a more general specification in which some commodities are unrelated with children while the others are substitutes. Considering some leisure goods as the substitutes for children, it aims to explain the demographic transition from high to low fertility with the observed increase in the relative price of children to that of leisure goods along with Galor and Weil's quality-quantity mechanism based on the observed increase in the educational attainments. This modification leads to a conclusion that the demographic transition is a natural phenomenon in this environment when children become relatively more expensive than leisure goods, even for a given level of education and a given price of leisure goods. In addition, an increase in education and a decrease in the price of leisure goods contribute to the demographic transition.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17116/2/MPRA_paper_17116.pdf
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/21803/1/MPRA_paper_21803.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 17116.

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    Date of creation: 17 Jul 2008
    Date of revision: 22 Aug 2009
    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:17116
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    1. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 2001. "Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 2727, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1995. "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1157, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Gary D. Hansen & Edward C. Prescott, 1999. "Malthus to Solow," Staff Report 257, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    4. Kogel, Tomas & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2001. " Agricultural Productivity Growth and Escape from the Malthusian Trap," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 337-57, December.
    5. Karen Kopecky, 2005. "The Trend in Retirement," Economie d'Avant Garde Research Reports 12, Economie d'Avant Garde.
    6. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M & Tamura, Robert, 1990. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S12-37, October.
    7. Galor, Oded, 2005. "From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 171-293 Elsevier.
    8. Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2005. "Trend in Hours: The U.S. from 1900 to 1950," Economie d'Avant Garde Research Reports 11, Economie d'Avant Garde, revised Nov 2005.
    9. Matthias Doepke, 2001. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," UCLA Economics Working Papers 804, UCLA Department of Economics.
    10. Tamura, Robert, 2002. "Human capital and the switch from agriculture to industry," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 207-242, December.
    11. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1999. "From Malthusian Stagnation to Modern Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 2082, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
    13. Michele Boldrin & Larry E. Jones, 2002. "Mortality, Fertility, and Saving in a Malthusian Economy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 775-814, October.
    14. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
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