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A Contribution to the Economic Theory of Fertility

Author

Listed:
  • Marla Ripoll

    (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Juan Carlos Cordoba

    (Iowa State University)

Abstract

We show that a non-separable formulation of preferences that allow for a low EIS but a high Elasticity of Intergenerational Substitution (EGS) can simultaneously account for the evidence of declining demand for children and increasing demand for longevity as income increases. The model with a single elasticity cannot account for both. Our results suggests a major role for a new parameter in macro, the EGS. While the EIS mostly influence short term economic decisions, the EGS influence mostly long term economic decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Marla Ripoll & Juan Carlos Cordoba, 2011. "A Contribution to the Economic Theory of Fertility," 2011 Meeting Papers 1207, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:1207
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Carlos Córdoba & Marla Ripoll, 2019. "The Elasticity of Intergenerational Substitution, Parental Altruism, and Fertility Choice," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 86(5), pages 1935-1972.
    2. Cordoba, Juan Carlos, 2012. "Children and the Wealth of Nations," Staff General Research Papers Archive 34989, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Córdoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2013. "What explains schooling differences across countries?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 184-202.
    4. Juan Carlos Cordoba, 2015. "Children, Dynastic Altruism and the Wealth of Nations," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(4), pages 774-791, October.
    5. Cordoba, Juan Carlos & Liu, Xiying, 2014. "Altruism, Fertility and Risk," Staff General Research Papers Archive 37481, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Juan Carlos Córdoba & Marla Ripoll, 2016. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Fertility–Income Relationship," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(593), pages 949-977, June.
    7. Cordoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2012. "Barro-Becker with Credit Frictions," Staff General Research Papers Archive 35531, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Cordoba, Juan C. & Liu, Xiying, 2016. "Malthusian Stagnation is Efficient," ISU General Staff Papers 201611270800001010, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    9. Liu, Xiying, 2015. "Optimal population and policy implications," ISU General Staff Papers 201501010800005546, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D00 - Microeconomics - - General - - - General
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D6 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics
    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis

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