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The Demographic Transition: Causes and Consequences

This paper develops the theoretical foundations and the testable implications of the various mechanisms that have been proposed as possible triggers for the demographic transition. Moreover, it examines the empirical validity of each of the theories and their significance for the understanding of the transition from stagnation to growth. The analysis suggests that the rise in the demand for human capital in the process of development was the main trigger for the decline in fertility and the transition to modern growth

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Paper provided by Brown University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2010-12.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:bro:econwp:2010-12
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

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