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Gender Equality and Long-Run Growth

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  • Lagerlof, Nils-Petter

Abstract

This research suggests that long-run economic and demographic development in Europe can be better understood when related to long-term trends in gender equality, dating back to the spread of Christianity. We set up a growth model where gaps in female-to-male human capital arise at equilibrium through a coordination process. An economy which over a long stretch of time re-coordinates on continuously more equal equilibria--as one could argue happened in Europe--exhibits growth patterns qualitatively similar to that of Europe. Copyright 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Lagerlof, Nils-Petter, 2003. "Gender Equality and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 403-426, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecgro:v:8:y:2003:i:4:p:403-26
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