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Differential Fecundity and Gender-Biased Parental Investments in Health

  • Aloysius Siow

    (University of Toronto)

  • Xiaodong Zhu

    (University of Toronto)

Women are fecund for a shorter period of their lives than men. In monogamous societies with divorce and remarriage, fecund women are relatively scarce. This paper studies how parents, who maximize discounted dynastic consumption, invest in the survival of their sons and daughters. The theory also generates endogenous sex ratios, income class sizes, and population growth. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/redy.2002.0196
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Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 5 (2002)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 999-1024

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Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:5:y:2002:i:4:p:999-1024
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