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Engines of Liberation

  • Jeremy Greenwood

    (University of Rochester)

  • Ananth Seshadri

    (University of Wisconsin)

  • Mehmet Yorukoglu

    (Sabanci Universitesi)

Electricity was born at the dawn of the last century. Households are inundated with a flood of consumer durables. What was the impact of this consumer goods revolution. It is argued here that the consumer goods revolution was conducive to liberating women from the home. To analyze this hypothesis, a Beckerian model of household production is developed. Households must decide whether or not to adopt the new technologies and whether a married woman should work. Can such a model help to explain the rise in married female labor-force participation that occurred in the last century? Yes.

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File URL: http://rcer.econ.rochester.edu/RCERPAPERS/rcer_503.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER) in its series RCER Working Papers with number 503.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:roc:rocher:503
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University of Rochester, Center for Economic Research, Department of Economics, Harkness 231 Rochester, New York 14627 U.S.A.

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