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What do we know about the timing of fertility transitions in europe?


  • Timothy Guinnane
  • Barbara Okun
  • James Trussell


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  • Timothy Guinnane & Barbara Okun & James Trussell, 1994. "What do we know about the timing of fertility transitions in europe?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(1), pages 1-20, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:31:y:1994:i:1:p:1-20
    DOI: 10.2307/2061905

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Oded Galor, 2012. "The demographic transition: causes and consequences," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 6(1), pages 1-28, January.
    2. Sascha Becker & Francesco Cinnirella & Ludger Woessmann, 2010. "The trade-off between fertility and education: evidence from before the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 177-204, September.
    3. Carol H. Shiue, 2017. "Human capital and fertility in Chinese clans before modern growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 351-396, December.
    4. T. Paul Schultz, 2001. "The Fertility Transition: Economic Explanations," Working Papers 833, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    5. repec:dem:demres:v:36:y:2017:i:42 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Tommy Murphy, 2015. "Old habits die hard (sometimes)," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 177-222, June.
    7. Guinnane, Timothy W> & Martinez Rodriguez, Susana, 2012. "For Every Law, a Loophole: Flexibility in the Menu of Spanish Business Forms, 1886-1936," Working Papers 103, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    8. Timothy W. Guinnane, 2011. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-614, September.
    9. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Chakraborty, Shankha, 2014. "Contraception and the Fertility Transition," MPRA Paper 53129, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Carl Schmertmann & Renato Assunção & Joseph Potter, 2010. "Knox meets Cox: Adapting epidemiological space-time statistics to demographic studies," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(3), pages 629-650, August.
    11. Guinnane Timothy W., 2006. "Der europäische Geburtenrückgang: Überblick, Erklärungen und Stand der Forschung," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 47(2), pages 249-273, December.
    12. Tommy Bengtsson & Martin Dribe, 2006. "Deliberate control in a natural fertility population: Southern Sweden, 1766–1864," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(4), pages 727-746, November.
    13. J. Hacker, 2003. "Rethinking the “early” decline of marital fertility in the united states," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(4), pages 605-620, November.
    14. John C. Brown & Timothy W. Guinnane, 2001. "The Fertility Transition in Bavaria," Working Papers 821, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    15. Dahan, Momi & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1998. "Demographic Transition, Income Distribution, and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 29-52, March.
    16. Timothy Guinnane & Carolyn Moehling & Cormac O Grada, 2001. "Fertility in South Dublin a Century Ago: A First Look," Working Papers 838, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    17. J. David Hacker, 2016. "Ready, Willing, and Able? Impediments to the Onset of Marital Fertility Decline in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(6), pages 1657-1692, December.
    18. Frans van Poppel & David Reher & Alberto Sanz-Gimeno & Maria Sanchez-Dominguez & Erik Beekink, 2012. "Mortality decline and reproductive change during the Dutch demographic transition," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(11), pages 299-338, August.
    19. Joseph E. Potter & Carl P. Schmertmann & Renato M. Assunção & Suzana M. Cavenaghi, 2010. "Mapping the Timing, Pace, and Scale of the Fertility Transition in Brazil," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 283-307.
    20. Kiyosi Hirosima, 2010. "Another tempo distortion: analyzing controlled fertility by age-specific marital fertility rate," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2010-003, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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