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Does longevity cause growth? A theoretical critique

  • Moshe Hazan
  • Hosny Zoabi

This paper challenges conventional wisdom by arguing that greater longevity may have contributed less than previously thought for the significant accumulation of human capital during the transition from stagnation to growth. This is because when parents make choices over the quantity and quality of their offspring, greater longevity positively affects not only the returns to quality but also the returns to quantity. The theory suggests that in contrast to longevity, improvements in health are more likely to generate quantity quality tradeoff. Finally, it shows the importance of controlling for fertility when empirically examining the impact of children’s health on their education. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Economic Growth.

Volume (Year): 11 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 363-376

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jecgro:v:11:y:2006:i:4:p:363-376
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