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Geography, Health, and the Pace of Demo-Economic Development

  • Strulik, Holger

This paper investigates the impact of subsistence consumption and extrinsic and intrinsic causes of child mortality on fertility and child expenditure. It offers a theory for why mankind multiplies at higher rates at geographically unfavorable, tropical locations. Placed into a macroeconomic framework this behavior creates an indirect channel through which geography shapes economic performance. It is explained why it are countries of low absolute latitude where we observe exceedingly slow (if not stalled) economic development and demographic transition.

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File URL: http://diskussionspapiere.wiwi.uni-hannover.de/pdf_bib/dp-361.pdf
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Paper provided by Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät in its series Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) with number dp-361.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-361
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