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Longevity and Education: A Macroeconomic Perspective

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  • Francesco Ricci
  • Marios Zachariadis

Abstract

This paper investigates the determinants of longevity at a macroeconomic level, emphasizing the important role played by education. To analyze the determinants of longevity, we build a model where households intentionally invest in health and education, and where education exerts external effects on longevity. Performing an empirical analysis using data across 71 countries, we find that society’s tertiary education attainment rate is important for longevity, in addition to any role that basic education plays for life expectancy at the individual level. This finding uncovers a key externality of education, consistent with the theoretical hypothesis advanced in our macroeconomic model.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Ricci & Marios Zachariadis, 2008. "Longevity and Education: A Macroeconomic Perspective," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 1-2008, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:1-2008
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    File URL: http://papers.econ.ucy.ac.cy/RePEc/papers/01-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Matteo Cervellati & Uwe Sunde, 2015. "The Economic and Demographic Transition, Mortality, and Comparative Development," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, pages 189-225.
    2. Anita Pelle, 2013. "The European Social Market Model in Crisis: At a Crossroads or at the End of the Road?," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(3), pages 1-16, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; life expectancy; health; externalities; absorptive capacity; welfare;

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