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The Role of Mortality in the Transmission of Knowledge

  • Oksana Leukhina

    (University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill)

  • Michael Bar

    (San Francisco State University)

in adult mortality, by improving knowledge transmission across time and encouraging more innovation, accounted for one third of the takeoff in output per capita.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 1256.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:1256
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Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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