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Second births in western Germany and France

Author

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  • Katja Köppen

    (Universität Rostock)

Abstract

We compare second birth risks in France and western Germany using data from the Family and Fertility Survey. Second birth risks are higher for highly educated women than for women with lower education in both countries. In western Germany, the positive effect weakens after controlling for the education level of the partner. The positive effect of French women’s education remains unchanged, even after controlling for the partners’ characteristics. We interpret this finding in the sense that work and family life are more compatible in France, where highly educated women can turn their education more often into work opportunities and income. West German women often have to make a decision between an employment career and motherhood as two exclusive life options. In such a situation, it is primarily the partners’ earning potential that influences fertility.

Suggested Citation

  • Katja Köppen, 2006. "Second births in western Germany and France," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(14), pages 295-330, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:14:y:2006:i:14
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol14/14/14-14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Øystein Kravdal, 2001. "The High Fertility of College Educated Women in Norway," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 5(6), pages 187-216, December.
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    4. FFF1Michaela NNN1Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility Decisions in the FRG and GDR: An Analysis with Data from the German Fertility and Family Survey," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(11), pages 275-318, April.
    5. Becker, Gary S, 1985. "Human Capital, Effort, and the Sexual Division of Labor," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 33-58, January.
    6. Karsten Hank & Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2000. "Does the availability of childcare influence the employment of mothers? Findings from western Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2000-003, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
    8. Ermisch, John F, 1988. "Purchased Child Care, Optimal Family Size and Mother's Employment," CEPR Discussion Papers 238, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Reuter, Silke, 2002. "Frankreichs Wohlfahrtsstaatsregime im Wandel? Erwerbsintegration von Französinnen und familienpolitische Reformen der 90er Jahre," Working papers of the ZeS 13/2002, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).
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    Cited by:

    1. Cornelia Mureşan, 2007. "Educational attainment and second births in Romania," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-028, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    comparative analysis; education; event history analysis; fertility; France; Germany; second births; West Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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