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Employment experience and first birth in Great Britain

Author

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  • Cordula Zabel

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

This article examines the effect of employment experience on first birth risks in Great Britain. The data used is from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). A positive effect of employment experience on first birth risks is found, in accordance with pre-dictions from economic models of fertility timing. This effect did not differ greatly between educational groups, in contrast to what was expected. Positive effects were found for all educational groups. An especially strong increase in first birth risks was found across the first year of employment spells.

Suggested Citation

  • Cordula Zabel, 2006. "Employment experience and first birth in Great Britain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2006-029
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2006-029.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ermisch, John F, 1988. "Purchased Child Care, Optimal Family Size and Mother's Employment," CEPR Discussion Papers 238, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    3. Joseph Hotz, V. & Klerman, Jacob Alex & Willis, Robert J., 1993. "The economics of fertility in developed countries," Handbook of Population and Family Economics,in: M. R. Rosenzweig & Stark, O. (ed.), Handbook of Population and Family Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 275-347 Elsevier.
    4. FFF1Michaela NNN1Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility Decisions in the FRG and GDR: An Analysis with Data from the German Fertility and Family Survey," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 3(11), pages 275-318, April.
    5. Glen Cain & Adriana Weininger, 1973. "Economic determinants of fertility: Results from cross sectional aggregate data," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 10(2), pages 205-223, May.
    6. Siv Gustafsson, 2001. "Optimal age at motherhood. Theoretical and empirical considerations on postponement of maternity in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 225-247.
    7. Siv S. Gustafsson & Shirley Dex & Cécile M. M. P. Wetzels & Jan Dirk Vlasblom, 1996. "Women`s labor force transitions in connection with childbirth: A panel data comparison between Germany, Sweden and Great Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 223-246.
    8. Blackburn, McKinley L & Bloom, David E & Neumark, David, 1993. "Fertility Timing, Wages, and Human Capital," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 6(1), pages 1-30.
    9. Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2004. "Fertility decisions in the FRG and GDR," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak & Anna Rybiñska & Valentina Tocchioni & Daniele Vignoli, 2013. "Diverse Paths into Childlessness over the Life Course," Working Papers 58, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    2. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2009. "Finding the "right moment" for the first baby to come: a comparison between Italy and Poland," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-011, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    United Kingdom; fertility determinants;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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