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Paternal childcare and parental leave policies: evidence from industrialized countries

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  • Christina Boll
  • Julian Leppin
  • Nora Reich

Abstract

This paper merges data from the Multinational Time Use Study (MTUS) with national parental leave characteristics from eight industrialized countries from 1971 to 2005 to estimate the association between national parental leave arrangements and paternal childcare. We also test whether this association varies according to a father’s educational level. We find that the number of parental leave weeks available to fathers and high rates of benefit are positively associated with fathers’ childcare time. This is generally robust when taking into account country and year as fixed effects, and other country-specific variables such as female employment rates. The magnitudes of the coefficients are economically significant. For example, high parental leave benefits compared to none are associated with an increase of almost 1 h per week in paternal childcare time. This relationship between benefit rate and time spent on childcare is strongest for highly educated fathers. They also benefit the most from exclusive ‘daddy weeks’ whereas the positive association of transferable leave to paternal childcare is solely driven by lowly educated fathers. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Christina Boll & Julian Leppin & Nora Reich, 2014. "Paternal childcare and parental leave policies: evidence from industrialized countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 129-158, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:12:y:2014:i:1:p:129-158
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-013-9211-z
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    Cited by:

    1. Anne E. Winkler, 2016. "Women’s labor force participation," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 289-289, August.
    2. Jessica Gabriele Walter, 2018. "The adequacy of measures of gender roles attitudes: a review of current measures in omnibus surveys," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 829-848, March.
    3. Bassford, Micaela & Fisher, Hayley, 2016. "Bonus babies? The impact of paid parental leave on fertility intentions," Working Papers 2016-04, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    4. Boll Christina & Wolf André & Rossen Anja, 2017. "The EU Gender Earnings Gap: Job Segregation and Working Time as Driving Factors," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 237(5), pages 407-452, October.
    5. Ann Bartel & Maya Rossin-Slater & Christopher Ruhm & Jenna Stearns & Jane Waldfogel, 2015. "Paid Family Leave, Fathers’ Leave-Taking, and Leave-Sharing in Dual-Earner Households," NBER Working Papers 21747, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Molly Mayer & Céline Le Bourdais, 2019. "Sharing Parental Leave Among Dual-Earner Couples in Canada: Does Reserved Paternity Leave Make a Difference?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(2), pages 215-239, April.
    7. Farré, Lídia, 2016. "Parental Leave Policies and Gender Equality: A Survey of the Literature/Permisos de Paternidad e igualdad de género: Una revisión de la literatura," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 34, pages 45-60, Enero.
    8. repec:ces:ifodic:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:19307502 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Christina Boll & Elisabeth Bublitz, 2018. "A Cross‐Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Job‐Related Training: The Role of Working Hours and the Household Context," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 56(3), pages 503-555, September.
    10. Clara Albrecht & Anita Fichtl & Peter Redler, 2017. "Fathers in Charge? Parental Leave Policies for Fathers in Europe," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(01), pages 49-51, April.
    11. repec:jid:journl:y:2018:v:25:i:1:p:1-53 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Tine Rostgaard & Anders Ejrnæs, 2021. "How Different Parental Leave Schemes Create Different Take-Up Patterns: Denmark in Nordic Comparison," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 9(2), pages 313-324.
    13. Christina Boll & Malte Jahn & Andreas Lagemann, 2017. "The gender lifetime earnings gap—exploring gendered pay from the life course perspective," Journal of Income Distribution, Ad libros publications inc., vol. 25(1), pages 1-53, March.
    14. Ariane Pailhé & Anne Solaz & Maxime Tô, 2018. "Can daddies learn how to change nappies? Evidence from a short paternity leave policy," Working Papers 240, French Institute for Demographic Studies.
    15. Clara Albrecht & Anita Fichtl & Peter Redler, 2017. "Fathers in Charge? Parental Leave Policies for Fathers in Europe," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(1), pages 49-51, 04.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Childcare; Fatherhood; Parental leave; Time use; D13; J13; J18;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy

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