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Children’s health-related life-styles: how parental child care affects them

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  • Jens Bonke

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  • Jane Greve

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Abstract

This paper examines parental influence on school children’s everyday activities that are related to a healthy or an unhealthy lifestyle. Using the Danish Time-Use and Consumption Survey from 2008/2009 with information on fathers’, mothers’ and children’s time use, we found no evidence of a relationship between parental working hours and children’s time allocations, while a 1-h increase in parental child care reduces the time children spent on TV/computer games by 12–19 min. We also found a relationship between parents’ and their children’s time use, as the amounts of time the two generations spent on exercise were positively correlated, which indicates that parental time use on some healthy activities affects children’s lifestyle behavior more than parental child care. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Jens Bonke & Jane Greve, 2012. "Children’s health-related life-styles: how parental child care affects them," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 557-572, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:10:y:2012:i:4:p:557-572
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-012-9157-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jay Stewart, 2014. "Early to bed and earlier to rise: school, maternal employment, and children’s sleep," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 29-50, March.
    2. Emanuele Millemaci & Dario Sciulli, 2014. "The long-term impact of family difficulties during childhood on labor market outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 663-687, December.
    3. Peng Nie & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2014. "Maternal employment and childhood obesity in China: evidence from the China Health and Nutrition Survey," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(20), pages 2418-2428, July.
    4. Christina Boll & Julian Leppin & Nora Reich, 2014. "Paternal childcare and parental leave policies: evidence from industrialized countries," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 129-158, March.
    5. Thérèse McDonnell & Orla Doyle, 2014. "Maternal Employment, Childcare and Childhood Overweight during Infancy," Working Papers 201416, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    6. Gwozdz, Wencke & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Reisch, Lucia A. & Ahrens, Wolfgang & Eiben, Gabriele & M. Fernandéz-Alvira, Juan & Hadjigeorgiou, Charalampos & De Henauw, Stefaan & Kovács, Eva & Lauria, Fabio, 2013. "Maternal employment and childhood obesity – A European perspective," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 728-742.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Children’s time use; Children’s lifestyles; Parental working hours; I12; J22; D13;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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