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Education and Health: Long-run Effects of Peers, Tracking and Years

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Fischer
  • Ulf-Göram Gerdtham,

    (Lund University, Sweden)

  • Gawain Heckley

    (Lund University, Sweden)

  • Martin Karlsson

    (University Duisburg-Essen, Germany)

  • Gustav Kjellsson

    (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)

  • Therese Nilsson

    (Lund University, Sweden)

Abstract

We investigate two parallel school reforms in Sweden to assess the long-run health effects of education. One reform only increased years of schooling, while the other increased years of schooling but also removed tracking leading to a more mixed socioeconomic peer group. By differencing the effects of the parallel reforms, we can separate the effect of de-tracking and peers from that of more schooling. We find that the pure years of schooling reform reduced mortality and improved current health. Differencing the effects of the reforms shows significant differences in the estimated impacts, suggesting that de-tracking and subsequent peer effects resulted in worse health.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Fischer & Ulf-Göram Gerdtham, & Gawain Heckley & Martin Karlsson & Gustav Kjellsson & Therese Nilsson, 2019. "Education and Health: Long-run Effects of Peers, Tracking and Years," CINCH Working Paper Series 1906, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health.
  • Handle: RePEc:duh:wpaper:1906
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health returns to education; school tracking; peer effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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