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Expanding schooling opportunities for 4-year-olds

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  • Leuven, Edwin
  • Lindahl, Mikael
  • Oosterbeek, Hessel
  • Webbink, Dinand

Abstract

We use a novel quasi-experimental strategy to estimate the effect of expanding early schooling enrollment possibilities on early achievement. It exploits two features of the school system in The Netherlands. The first is rolling admissions; children are allowed to start school immediately after their 4th birthday instead of at the beginning of the school year. The second is that children having their birthday before, during and after the summer holiday are placed in the same class. These features generate sufficient exogenous variation in children's enrollment opportunities to identify its effects on test scores. Making available one additional month of time in school increases language scores of disadvantaged pupils by 6 percent of a standard deviation and their math scores by 5 percent of a standard deviation. For non-disadvantaged pupils we find no effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Leuven, Edwin & Lindahl, Mikael & Oosterbeek, Hessel & Webbink, Dinand, 2010. "Expanding schooling opportunities for 4-year-olds," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 319-328, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:29:y:2010:i:3:p:319-328
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    Cited by:

    1. Hitoshi Shigeoka, 2015. "School Entry Cutoff Date and the Timing of Births," NBER Working Papers 21402, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Calero, Jorge & Escardíbul, J. Oriol, 2016. "Proceso educativo y resultados del alumnado nativo y de origen inmigrante en España. Un análisis basado en PISA-2012/Educational Process and Native and Immigrant Students? Results. An Analysis Based o," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 34, pages 413-438, Mayo.
    3. Rønning, Marte, 2011. "Who benefits from homework assignments?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 55-64, February.
    4. Edwin Leuven & Marte Rønning, 2016. "Classroom Grade Composition and Pupil Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(593), pages 1164-1192, June.
    5. Dickert-Conlin, Stacy & Elder, Todd, 2010. "Suburban legend: School cutoff dates and the timing of births," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 826-841, October.
    6. Szilvia Hamori & Janos Kollo, 2011. "Whose Children Gain from Starting School Later? Evidence from Hungary," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1102, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    7. Fitzpatrick, Maria D. & Grissmer, David & Hastedt, Sarah, 2011. "What a difference a day makes: Estimating daily learning gains during kindergarten and first grade using a natural experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 269-279, April.
    8. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2011. "Too Young to Leave the Nest? The Effects of School Starting Age," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 455-467, May.
    9. Ylenia Brilli, 2012. "Public and parental investments in children. Evidence from the literature on non-parental child care," CHILD Working Papers Series 6, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    10. Drange, Nina & Havnes, Tarjei & Sandsør, Astrid M. J., 2012. "Kindergarten for All: Long Run Effects of a Universal Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 6986, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Cattan, Sarah & Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 10995, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Olivier Filatriau & Denis Fougère & Maxime To, 2013. "Will Sooner Be Better ? The Impact of Early Preschool Enrollment on Cognitive and Noncognitive Achievement of Children," Working Papers 2013-10, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    13. Patrizia Ordine & Giuseppe Rose & Daniela Sposato, 2014. "Gift Of Time And Family Gift: The Effect Of Early School Entry On Pupils Performance," Working Papers 201408, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    14. Henry M. Levin & Heather L. Schwartz, 2012. "Comparing Costs of Early Childhood Care and Education Programs: An International Perspective," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 201(2), pages 39-65, June.
    15. Drange, Nina & Havnes, Tarjei & Sandsør, Astrid M.J., 2016. "Kindergarten for all: Long run effects of a universal intervention," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 164-181.
    16. Goulas, Sofoklis & Megalokonomou, Rigissa, 2016. "Swine Flu and The Effect of Compulsory Class Attendance on Academic Performance," MPRA Paper 75395, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Köllő, János & Hámori, Szilvia, 2011. "Kinek használ az évvesztés?. Iskolakezdési kor és tanulói teljesítmények Magyarországon
      [Who gains by postponed schooling?. Age at starting school and achievement as pupils in Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 133-157.
    18. Asaad Ismail Ali & Andrea Kutinova Menclova, 2017. "Expanding Schooling Opportunities in the Netherlands: A Replication of Leuven et al. (2010)," Working Papers in Economics 17/03, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    19. Robertson, Erin, 2011. "The effects of quarter of birth on academic outcomes at the elementary school level," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 300-311, April.
    20. Drange, Nina & Havnes, Tarjei & Sandsør, Astrid M. J., 2012. "Kindergarten for All: Long Run Effects of a Universal Intervention," IZA Discussion Papers 6986, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    21. Cattan, Sarah & Kamhofer, Daniel A. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "The Short- and Long-term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 1188, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    22. Nina Drange & Kjetil Telle, 2017. "Preschool and school performance of children from immigrant families," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 825-867, March.
    23. Thomas S. Dee & Hans Henrik Sievertsen, 2015. "The Gift of Time? School Starting Age and Mental Health," NBER Working Papers 21610, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Sarah Cattan & Daniel A. Kamhöfer & Martin Karlsson & Therese Nilsson, 2017. "The short- and long-term effects of student absence: evidence from Sweden," IFS Working Papers W17/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early childhood education Achievement Evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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